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There are no job sites for STEM majors with no experience, are there?

  • #1
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Main Question or Discussion Point

I'm currently living in Hawaii, and am having trouble finding good work. I have been using Indeed without much success at all. I also know about Monster and Glassdoor, but I tend to want to stick to just one generic job-hunting site. I recently found a job site associated apparently with the Mathematical Association of America, but I have found no results in my area. I also found a job site associated with the American Mathematical Society, but the jobs offered are far beyond my level, renown, and ability. Anyway, this begs the question asked in the title.

For future reference, my resume doesn't look none too impressive. I've had just the one job assisting with online database management, correction, and compilation of reports using statistics derived from said database. And the database is used strictly within the state. I've also some volunteer experience working as an office assistant, but I doubt it will help me to progress to a job I want. I cannot drive and have nearly non-existent social skills. I lack the ability to program in pretty much any language. It is a shame, since this ability comes up as a job requirement more times than I can count. In short, I am very much unemployable, and the only reason why my current job keeps me is because they know firsthand my work ethic from my eight months volunteering there.

As for my progress pertaining to my ultimate goal of what I want to do, I'd been working on the self-evaluation check-list for at least a month. I learned that my strengths include data entry, Excel, writing composition, and I have a knack for noticing details that are often overlooked. I learned that I like writing, like practicing my mother's language, and I like going to the library to read, write, and just have time to myself. I sometimes like looking at my old math books every blue moon. I learned that I dislike working with children, I dislike programming, and I very much do not want to return to school at the present moment. I am weak in social skills, hands-on activities, and programming. I want an interesting job, but as long as it pays for the bare essentials. And I don't care about location as long as I can afford housing in it. In any case, I still cannot find an answer to the one question these SECL's are meant to help me think about. I am told that it would take months for me to answer the question using this tool, so I figure that it's reasonable that I haven't an answer yet.

But I digress. I did not make this topic to explain how woefully unprepared I am for the working world. I am fully aware that my question is one born of wishful thinking. I figure, though, that it doesn't hurt to ask.
 
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Answers and Replies

  • #2
phinds
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Regardless of experience, I think it's a terrible idea to limit yourself to a single employment site. To me that suggests that you are not serious about your search. If you really want results you should be working your butt off to get them and that would include using every job site you can find.
 
  • #3
symbolipoint
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The "lack of social skills", only a slight problem, and not very important. One can compensate for this; usually, by if you have something to say, then say it, although that brief comment is missing contextual details.

The lack of programming skills and desire to avoid having to create programs, IS a problem (especially if you have Math degree and want a Math job) which you could or should fix. Stop worrying about liking-or-not-liking it; but go ahead and learn some language, even if it means going to school for one or two semesters.
 
  • #4
Vanadium 50
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As you yourself pointed out, more than a year ago, you have asked us many, many times what to do. You get pretty much the same advice, over and over. You don't take it. Your choice, but now you're not where you want to be. I am not sure that more advice from PF that you will most likely ignore is the solution.
 
  • #5
WWGD
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Eclair XII seems to want an easy ride. Can't you live on the beach , surfing and eating fish and coconuts and drop by others' luaus?
 
  • #6
ZapperZ
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I'm currently living in Hawaii, and am having trouble finding good work. I have been using Indeed without much success at all. I also know about Monster and Glassdoor, but I tend to want to stick to just one generic job-hunting site. I recently found a job site associated apparently with the Mathematical Association of America, but I have found no results in my area. I also found a job site associated with the American Mathematical Society, but the jobs offered are far beyond my level, renown, and ability. Anyway, this begs the question asked in the title.
There are no job sites for STEM majors with no experience, are there?

Answer: Yes there are.

Proof: A lot of STEM new graduates get jobs!

Next!

Zz.
 
  • #7
WWGD
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At worse, you can start in an IT possition and move laterally ( within the company) into a STEM one , if you do a good job.
 
  • #8
StatGuy2000
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@Eclair_de_XII , from your past posts, the issue here specifically is that you are currently living in Hawaii. As I believe I have mentioned to you before, Hawaii does not have an especially diversified economy (relying mostly on tourism and the US military spending), and so doesn't have an especially high amount of STEM jobs.

Your best bet is to cast a wide net, searching multiple job sites, networking with many different employers, and expand your job search outside Hawaii.

I understand that may be difficult for you if you have strong family roots in Hawaii (especially if you are Native Hawaiian), but hey, you're here complaining about a lack of work where you live. So go and find jobs elsewhere! (Others have done this -- just ask many a Canadian who have done just that!)

Your best bet for STEM jobs would be the West Coast of the US, Texas, or the northeastern US.
 
  • #10
symbolipoint
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Eclair_de_XII,
Have you considered some of your experience, both employed, and academic, as applicable to/for any jobs on the one selected site?
 
  • #11
WWGD
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There are also plenty of remote jobs to keep you busy until you find a brick-mortar one ( if that is what you prefer.)
 
  • #12
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The lack of programming skills and desire to avoid having to create programs, IS a problem (especially if you have Math degree and want a Math job) which you could or should fix. Stop worrying about liking-or-not-liking it; but go ahead and learn some language, even if it means going to school for one or two semesters.
I'm willing to study Python and R on my own using books, but I'm not willing to go back to school. I didn't have a good time in school and I'm not overly eager to return to academia right now.

At worse, you can start in an IT possition and move laterally ( within the company) into a STEM one , if you do a good job.
I hadn't thought of doing any IT work. A few jobs in the field do not appear to require experience or a degree of sorts. In any case, thank you. I shall look into it while job-searching.

Your best bet is to cast a wide net, searching multiple job sites, networking with many different employers, and expand your job search outside Hawaii.
Understood.

As a job-seeker, I should really be doing my own research on what sites to use and I should really be pro-actively using as many as necessary. I shall do so.

I have many apprehensions about contacting different employers. I'm not a social person. And I'm very much intimidated by those more successful than I am. I am afraid that any employer I attempt to contact will look at my experience and qualifications, and deem me a joke.

I am more than willing to search for work outside of Hawaii. But the main concern I have is that of transportation. I cannot drive well. And every time I'd think of applying to some company on the mainland United States, I think of my job experience (or rather, lack thereof), my inability to drive, and my lack of useful skills for my major. Then I start thinking about how easily my application would be dismissed because my resume looks like trash. I'm just not really that employable. Now I'm re-evaluating my life, and now I'm wondering what I've been doing this entire time and why. In any case, I have not been actively searching for employment abroad for reasons--or rather excuses--thus stated.

Have you considered some of your experience, both employed, and academic, as applicable to/for any jobs on the one selected site?
I have found a data entry position that meets my current experience. It's at a staffing agency.

I'm also waiting on a phone call from a bank regarding a data analyst position that seemed like a good match to my qualifications. But I'm not particularly optimistic about being contacted. For one, it's been a month since I applied, and I've e-mailed them several times inquiring them about the status of my application; they have not responded. And just the other day, after work, I called them asking about it. Normally, when I have my designated break at my current job, their office seems to be closed. But I took off work early yesterday for reasons I am not willing to go into and tried calling them again. The woman who answered told me that they'd call me back in about fifteen minutes. Fifteen minutes came and went. I tried calling them again, only to find out that their office closes at three o'clock PM, and that the woman who answered didn't feel like taking my inquiry for some unknown reason. In any case, I am more than sure that I've waited too long to call the bank back. I feel like I should have learned a valuable lesson about being more pro-active about seeking work after this. In any case, I plan to call them back on Monday, just to be sure that I messed up.

In any case, there was a government job that required nothing more than an education focused on probability and statistics. There are thirty-nine other applicants for this position; or at least, there will be when they begin screening for good applicants. Again, I'm not particularly enthusiastic about my prospects with this position, primarily due to my lack of statistical programming experience.

In hindsight, I regret not being more pro-active about seeking work or attempting to make myself more employable these past six months (particularly, by studying programming). I just kept complaining and doing nothing about it. I'm still doing it. Only when my current boss tells me that I'm being laid off and have until the end of the year to find work, do I make a serious effort to do so. I really am lazy. I regret not taking my academic career seriously. Additionally, I am very sorry to those of you who gave me advice during my academic career that I chose to ignore. I'd been a stubborn fool, and I regret causing headaches and frustration for those of you who have tried to give me help in the past.

In any case, these are the positions that I feel I am eligible for, and I am feeling good about only one of them.

There are also plenty of remote jobs to keep you busy until you find a brick-mortar one ( if that is what you prefer.)
I never really considered that as an option. And I wish I had a better reason why I always disregarded it. I'll take care to include that in the list of job types I will search for in the future.
 
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  • #13
WWGD
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Consider too, ZipRecruiter, where, once you have submitted your CV, they have some 1-click applications, i.e., you apply for jobs with just one click.
 
  • #14
symbolipoint
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You are in a job currently. If anything is wrong with it, then only you know what. Your concerns, technical related, are (1) How safe for you is looking for another job, and (2) How effectively can you learn Programming on your own. Otherwise, look into what WWGD said.
 
  • #15
Dr. Courtney
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The book, "What Color is Your Parachute" has been very helpful to a number of job seekers I've known over the years.
 
  • #16
StatGuy2000
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Understood.

As a job-seeker, I should really be doing my own research on what sites to use and I should really be pro-actively using as many as necessary. I shall do so.

I have many apprehensions about contacting different employers. I'm not a social person. And I'm very much intimidated by those more successful than I am. I am afraid that any employer I attempt to contact will look at my experience and qualifications, and deem me a joke.
One of the most important things you do is not to feel intimidated -- the people who are hiring you are people, just like anyone else. It's best to always project an image of confidence when you go into interviews or when you call them, even if you have to "fake" it.

If an employer thinks you're a "joke", the worst thing that could happen to you is that you won't get the job. Well, then you apply to the next job that could be the start of a career. That's how you proceed!

I am more than willing to search for work outside of Hawaii. But the main concern I have is that of transportation. I cannot drive well. And every time I'd think of applying to some company on the mainland United States, I think of my job experience (or rather, lack thereof), my inability to drive, and my lack of useful skills for my major. Then I start thinking about how easily my application would be dismissed because my resume looks like trash. I'm just not really that employable. Now I'm re-evaluating my life, and now I'm wondering what I've been doing this entire time and why. In any case, I have not been actively searching for employment abroad for reasons--or rather excuses--thus stated.
First off, there are places in the mainland US that have access to public transportation (e.g. subways, trains, buses). Granted, there aren't too many of these places, but they are available.

Second, driving is a skill that you can improve on the more you practice. Think about taking (or re-taking) a driving course offered at various driving schools (I'm sure they exist on Hawaii). These schools can give you great tips on how to improve your driving.
 
  • #17
PeroK
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I'm willing to study Python and R on my own using books, but I'm not willing to go back to school. I didn't have a good time in school and I'm not overly eager to return to academia right now.

I hadn't thought of doing any IT work. A few jobs in the field do not appear to require experience or a degree of sorts. In any case, thank you. I shall look into it while job-searching.
It's difficult to give good advice without really knowing you, but here are my observations.

What sort of degree did you get? I saw many of your HH posts and, to be honest, I could see you struggled. You never seemed to give up, but maths didn't come easily to you.

The job market is competitive. While you are at University, you are paying them. To get a job, someone is going to have to pay you. I suspect it could be a waste of time and effort to go looking for a good job in STEM.

The next question is whether you really want to go into IT. Programming is competitive and if you've gone through a maths degree without ever learning to programme, then I'd ask why would you choose that as a career?

I would seriously look around for other ideas. If you really want to explore IT careers, I'd say support is a better option. You can get yourself through MCSE courses quickly and relatively inexpensively. With a maths degree and some techie qualifications you've got a chance.

I spent my career in IT and hired a lot of people in that time. To be honest, I can't see me hiring you as a programmer or software engineer. However much you jazz up your CV and say the right things at an interview.

But, with some qualifications behind you and the right attitude, you might land a job as a junior sys admin. To me, that's more plausible. And, that career is open ended as well. And, I think there's more room early in your career for non-technical skills: change management, problem management, working with suppliers. Even getting into commercial stuff: putting costed proposals together.

I might be wrong, of course, but that's how I see it.

PS another option, of course, is IT testing.
 
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  • #18
StatGuy2000
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As for my progress pertaining to my ultimate goal of what I want to do, I'd been working on the self-evaluation check-list for at least a month. I learned that my strengths include data entry, Excel, writing composition, and I have a knack for noticing details that are often overlooked. I learned that I like writing, like practicing my mother's language, and I like going to the library to read, write, and just have time to myself. I sometimes like looking at my old math books every blue moon. I learned that I dislike working with children, I dislike programming, and I very much do not want to return to school at the present moment. I am weak in social skills, hands-on activities, and programming. I want an interesting job, but as long as it pays for the bare essentials. And I don't care about location as long as I can afford housing in it. In any case, I still cannot find an answer to the one question these SECL's are meant to help me think about. I am told that it would take months for me to answer the question using this tool, so I figure that it's reasonable that I haven't an answer yet.
I just saw the rest of your post here. Given what you highlight above, I think you are ideally suited for work in accounting (especially in certain specialties like forensic accounting). After all, one of the most important skills that an accountant needs to notice are details in financial documents.

Accountants don't need to do much in the way of programming (except in very limited circumstances, and more often those are done by IT specialists working with accountants), and don't need to work with children. Accountants do need social skills (as every job does), but this is something you can improve with practice. Now I know that accounting is not STEM work, but it is work that utilizes mathematical skill, so it may still be something up your alley.

The only issue is that you will need to go back to school to qualify to become an accountant, but your math degree should provide at least some of the prerequisites, so you likely will not have to go through another 4 year degree.

Other options:

1. Actuarial work, which I believe you and I mentioned in your other threads.

2. Paralegal work, assisting lawyers in research. I would assume they would spend a lot of time in libraries or city archives going over documents.

3. Technical writing -- I know you said you don't like programming and are weak at it, but if you still want to stay within the STEM field, preparing documentation on technical areas might be something you may like.

If you are able to translate technical documentation into other languages, then that would be especially valuable, depending on what other language you speak. You mentioned practicing your mother's language -- if that language happens to be Mandarin Chinese, Japanese, or Korean, you could be very employable.
 
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