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There is nothing I am interested in

  1. Nov 5, 2015 #1
    I picked engineering because it seemed to combine a lot of my likes, but I discovered I hate math with a passion. I took a test offered by my school but it came back "engineering fits you" which it doesn't. The other things on the lists basically sounded like glorified repairman. I don't want to spend my life telling people to try turning it on, or try resetting it. I also don't want to work my current job, or anything like it again. I feel stuck and hopeless, can anyone help me out here? I also don't want to work outside, at all if it can be helped.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 5, 2015 #2
    Well what exactly are your likes? And in what year of your education are you currently in?
     
  4. Nov 5, 2015 #3
    It seems like the main things you're looking at are what you don't want in a job. There is a near infinite list of things that will entail, so maybe forget about that for a moment. How about you sit down and write up a list of all the things you do want in a job. What are your interests? What do you enjoy doing in your spare time? Then use these attributes to match up with a job. If you focus more on what you do want as opposed to what you don't, you're more likely to find a positive match.
     
  5. Nov 5, 2015 #4
    I like science, but that requires math, so anything scientific is probably out. I like language, but apparently it's extremely hard just to get going, and once you do you never make very much. I like music, but again that's near impossible to "make it" in, people tell me I'm good, but it never leads anywhere so I only assume they are lying. Other than that, I don't have any real interests.
     
  6. Nov 5, 2015 #5
    It's true that science does generally require math; it's like trying to read Mark Twain when you hate English.

    So let's look at the other option, languages and music. Both of these things are totally viable job options, and anyone who tells you otherwise if frankly doing you a disservice. If you enjoy these things, then look for the intersection between your interests (in this case language and music), and what people are willing to pay for it. For example, according to Radio Free Europe, top-tier interpreters at the UN can make 6-figure salaries - so clearly this is not a field with no financial opportunities. Benny the Irish Polyglot makes a considerable amount of money learning and teaching languages. Monetization is simply a matter of creativity.

    Music is a similar ball game. The question is what people are willing to pay for. If you are creative with monetization, you can make quite a lot of money. Video game companies need background music, and so do most marketing companies, companies who would likely pay good money for a composition. Similarly, teaching music online is a very good source of passive income.

    Your options are never closed - there is always something you can do.
     
  7. Nov 5, 2015 #6

    symbolipoint

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    Not necessarily.

    What courses of Mathematics have you learned WELL? Which courses do/did you still find to be difficult? Have you any experience using Mathematics for its decision-making power? Have you used any Mathematics for any leisure time planning, academic course content planning, (that is like, preparing your laboratory science course exercises)? Would you wish to use mathematical skills as part of any design work?

    You are also ignoring how easy and at the human level is the learning, study, and practice of languages other than your own native one. Courses of these (which include culture & history instruction) can do anything from making you more employable in a great variety of fields, to your becoming a language teacher or a translator or interpreter. Do you realize that the demand for E.S.L. teachers is still fairly high? And depending where in the world you are, you do not need to know the language of the student. (but it helps sometimes).
     
  8. Nov 5, 2015 #7
    The problem with interpreting that I have been told is most people prefer native speakers, and no matter how good you may be, they just don't want you if you're not. I have no wish to be a teacher online or otherwise. My mom did it for years and hated every second of it, and I don't really like the thought of it either. I wouldn't mind being a composer of film and games, but again, how does one get there? I can't imagine the job opportunities are limitless. I feel I could be good at interpreting if I could just figure out how to get there.
     
  9. Nov 5, 2015 #8

    symbolipoint

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    Interpreting and Translation are two very different things. Do or would you prefer one over the other?
    Worrying about not being top-tier as an interpreter is not something you are ready for. Try to be a good student first.

    Options in languages are not limited to just "interpreting". Can you learn to think and plan? Can you take a statement of some accomplishment that is needed, and then DESIGN a way to make this accomplishment happen? If you say, "Yes", then maybe you can become... an engineer, .... or a LANGUAGE TEACHER (for some foreign language), such as to teach in a high school, or a private school, or an adult-level school to teach English as a Second Language.
     
  10. Nov 5, 2015 #9
    The first step is to learn a language, and immerse yourself in it. You start off not at the top tier, and work hard and get yourself up to the "top tier".

    Who keeps telling you this stuff? It seems like all they're trying to do is dissuade you. Think about it - what are they native speakers of? Another language besides English, sure, but you're a native speaker too, and of the single most studied language in the world. You have an edge over other nationalities because no matter what language you choose (except Mandarin), your competition is less than the ones going to English. If you speak Swahili for example, or you speak Tagalog, your competitive market is likely not that massive, especially if you become a translator elsewhere besides the UN.

    There's alway some form of market if you look hard enough.

    Fair enough.

    One gets there by networking with people in your area. Are there any game companies in your area? Are they willing to pay money for an original composition tailor made to their game? Especially target smaller companies to begin with, as they have access to a smaller array of artists and so are more likely to hire you. They may pay less, but money is money is money.

    Start at the basics, and if you know of any interpreters where you live, talk to them! Find out how they got to where they are. Don't be afraid to ask people in the profession.

    Good luck!
     
  11. Nov 6, 2015 #10

    russ_watters

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    You're only following Dewgale's advice for three words at a time. Seriously: you need to stop looking at this problem from the wrong direction. You will never find something you will like to do if you are only/primarily looking for things you don't like to do/don't think you can do.

    Engineering is broad, but the not-so-dirty secret is that a great many engineering jobs don't require math beyond algebra. So as long as you can struggle through the math successfully it in college, not liking/being "bad" at math doesn't need to prevent you from being an engineer. So stop using that as an excuse/roadblock and answer the question: what do you want in a job?
     
  12. Nov 6, 2015 #11

    Dale

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    If there is nothing that you are interested in then obviously you will have an uninteresting job. And an uninteresting life.
     
  13. Nov 6, 2015 #12
    Why are engineers forced to learn all that math if they never use it? Seriously, I just don't want to spend my life taking math courses. I would like to not hate my career choice, and I want something stable, and something with options beyond "teacher."
     
  14. Nov 6, 2015 #13

    SteamKing

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    A lot of the math you learn as an engineering undergrad is so you can understand what is going on in other courses. For example, fluid mechanics uses a lot of vector calculus, so if you don't know vector calculus, you're stuck watching the paint dry on the classroom walls while the lecturer talks about div and grad and curl.

    If you want to be a structural engineer, you need to know basic single variable calculus at a minimum, otherwise you're stuck knowing only how to solve beam problems which are contained in a handbook. If you want to analyze structures using finite element techniques, it takes not a little knowledge of linear algebra to understand how to derive and use a stiffness matrix to solve a problem.

    Some engineers, believe it or not, want to enroll in graduate school after getting a degree. Graduate courses tend to have a lot of math, so again, if you want to get an advanced degree, you need to know plenty of math.

    If you want an uncomplicated job where you don't need to know a lot of math, memorizing the phrase, "Do you want fries with that?" comes in handy.
     
  15. Nov 6, 2015 #14

    symbolipoint

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    You did not read what we said very carefully, and you did NOT THINK about what we said.

    Exactly which mathematics will an engineer need to use? Nobody knows. You must be prepared for as much as may be predicted, so one must study THE WHOLE SUB-COMPONENT OF THE REQUIRED MATH COURSES IN THE PROGRAM, and sometimes more.
     
  16. Nov 6, 2015 #15

    Vanadium 50

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    A few points:

    One is that I think I agree with many of the others - you seem not to be taking the responses very seriously. If you continue down this path, people will eventually stop responding.

    Another is that it's probably true that you'll directly use only about 10% of what you learn in school. Thing is, you never know which 10%. Continuing along that path, the attitude that learning more than the bare minimum is somehow a bad thing is not helpful to an engineer. Or members of many professions.

    As Dale says, "If there is nothing that you are interested in then obviously you will have an uninteresting job." The other side of that coin is that if you are certain that there's nothing you are interested in and no job is more interesting than any other, you might as well select a job based on salary.
     
  17. Nov 6, 2015 #16
    So I should just agree with what everyone says? Is that it?
     
  18. Nov 7, 2015 #17

    symbolipoint

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    No. That is not enough. You need to understand, and to find some interests and develop some of them. Look for programs to study according to your interests or your career goals.
     
  19. Nov 7, 2015 #18

    micromass

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    OK, let's try something else. A lot of your career goals involve math. So why do you hate math? Maybe you hate math for the wrong reasons and it is something that can be fixed.
     
  20. Nov 7, 2015 #19
    Your negativity is astounding. People are sincerely trying to help you here, when you obviously do not want to be helped. Everything that someone has said to you you have thrown back at them, blandly and mindlessly turning it away or dismissing it. If you want to wallow in misery forever, then do that I guess. If not, reread everything in this thread and try to think about your options. People have repeatedly told you that you have many viable ones.
     
  21. Nov 8, 2015 #20

    StatGuy2000

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    To the OP:

    A question for you: what exactly do you hate about math? Is it because you have trouble understanding the subject? Do you have a difficult time with solving word problems using math, or doing proofs of math, or remembering formulas? Or is it the fact that you had a bad teacher?

    Because in my opinion, people who say they "hate math with a passion" are really telling me "I'm struggling with math" or "I don't understand math". Math can be a beautiful, fascinating subject if taught well. So my suggestion is to work on your weakness through self-study, online learning, tutoring, and many career areas will open up that you will find interesting.
     
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