Time Travel to Future: Is There a Minimum Speed?

In summary, the conversation discusses the concept of traveling back in time by moving faster than the speed of light and whether there is a minimum speed. The expert explains that all motion is relative and there is no such thing as absolute motion. They also clarify that traveling into the future is a natural occurrence and does not require specific conditions. The conversation is closed due to misunderstandings and the expert recommends studying the concept of relativity further.
  • #1
Dakota
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Theoretically you can travel back in time by moving faster than the speed of light, or the universal speed limit. Is there a minimum speed? 0. But with gravity you would be moving, so if you move against gravity relative to yourself you are moving. So if there was a place in the universe free of a gravitational pull or the gravitational pull was the same from all sides you would be moving at a true 0. So my question is; can you stop moving and if so is that the minimum speed, and if it is what would time do? would it take you to the future?
 
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  • #2
Dakota said:
Theoretically you can travel back in time by moving faster than the speed of light, or the universal speed limit. Is there a minimum speed? 0. But with gravity you would be moving, so if you move against gravity relative to yourself you are moving. So if there was a place in the universe free of a gravitational pull or the gravitational pull was the same from all sides you would be moving at a true 0. So my question is; can you stop moving and if so is that the minimum speed, and if it is what would time do? would it take you to the future?
You seem to believe that there is such a thing as absolute motion. There is absolute acceleration, but other than that, all motion is relative so "moving at 0" is not a meaningful concept except in relation to some other object.
 
  • #3
Dakota said:
Theoretically you can travel back in time by moving faster than the speed of light, or the universal speed limit.
Kinda sorta... Google for "tachyonic antitelephone" to see how faster-than-light travel can be described as going backwards in time. (If you find the description of the anti-telephone complicated or confusing, or if any of the math is even slightly unclear... That will be a hint that you should spend some time with a good basic textbook - I recommend Taylor and Wheeler's "Spacetime Physics").

Is there a minimum speed? 0. But with gravity you would be moving, so if you move against gravity relative to yourself you are moving. So if there was a place in the universe free of a gravitational pull or the gravitational pull was the same from all sides you would be moving at a true 0. So my question is; can you stop moving and if so is that the minimum speed, and if it is what would time do? would it take you to the future?
The quick answer is that of course you travel into the future, whether in a gravitational field or not - I'm doing it right now, traveling into the future at a rate of one second every second.

However, you have a more serious misunderstanding here. All speeds are relative; it never makes sense to say that something is moving without saying what it is moving relative to. Thus, there cannot be anything special about speed zero - it just means that whatever we're talking about is not moving relative to its immediate surroundings. I'm sitting in a comfortable chair right now. Am I moving? Not according to someone in the same room watching me... But I'm moving at several kilometers a second relative to a Martian astronomer resting comfortably in his chair on Mars and watching me through a telescope. You have to really seriously wrap your mind around this notion that all motion is relative, that there is no moving and not moving, before you will be able to understand relativity.

As this thread is based on a number of misunderstandings, it is closed and will remain closed.
 
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1. How does the concept of time travel to the future work?

Time travel to the future is a hypothetical concept where an individual or object moves forward in time beyond the present. This is based on the theory of relativity which states that as an object moves at a higher speed, time slows down for that object compared to a stationary observer. Therefore, if an individual were to travel at a very high speed, they would experience time passing slower than someone who is stationary, effectively traveling to the future.

2. Is there a minimum speed required for time travel to the future?

According to the theory of relativity, there is no minimum speed required for time travel to the future. However, the closer an object approaches the speed of light (299,792,458 meters per second), the more significant the time dilation effect becomes. This means that the faster an object travels, the further into the future it will go.

3. Can time travel to the future be achieved through any means other than high speeds?

As of now, time travel to the future can only be achieved through high speeds. Some theories suggest that it may also be possible through the use of wormholes or black holes, but these are still purely speculative and have not been proven to be feasible.

4. How far into the future can one travel through time travel?

Theoretically, there is no limit to how far into the future one can travel through time travel. As mentioned earlier, the closer an object approaches the speed of light, the further into the future it will go. However, traveling to the distant future would require extremely high speeds, which may not be possible with our current technology.

5. Are there any potential dangers or consequences of time travel to the future?

There are currently no known dangers or consequences of time travel to the future, as it is still a purely theoretical concept. However, some theories suggest that the time traveler may experience physical and psychological effects due to the extreme speeds and time dilation. Additionally, traveling too far into the future may also pose the risk of being unable to return to one's original time period.

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