Torque Provided By A Rocket's Thrust

In summary, the conversation revolves around the question of what the angular acceleration of a 200 g model rocket, producing 4.0 N of thrust, spinning in a horizontal circle at the end of a 100 g rigid rod, would be. Despite initial confusion regarding the torque generated by the rod's gravitational pull and its impact on the total torque, it is explained that the supporting structure of the rocket has already balanced this torque, allowing for the horizontal movement.
  • #1
cjavier
17
0
The Question Is: The 200 g model rocket shown in the figure generates 4.0 N of thrust. It spins in a horizontal circle at the end of a 100 g rigid rod. What is its angular acceleration? Here is the picture:

http://session.masteringphysics.com/problemAsset/1073775/3/knight_Figure_13_24.jpg

However, I am confused that every answer I have seen does not take into account the torque generated by the rod's gravitational pull to produce the Total Torque (Sigma Torque). Why is this?

PLEASE do not just post to me how to get the answer. I have seen this. I also realize that the moment of inertia take's into account the rod. However, I still believe that the gravitational pull of the rod should be accounted for in the total torque. Please, someone with experience explain to me why this is not so.
 
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  • #2
You are told that the rocket moves in a horizontal circle, so somehow the torque from the weight of rocket plus rod has already been balanced by the supporting structure.
 
  • #3
Question Resolved

HORIZONTAL. I see now. Thank you
 

Related to Torque Provided By A Rocket's Thrust

1. What is torque provided by a rocket's thrust?

Torque provided by a rocket's thrust is the measure of the rotating force or moment that a rocket's thrust produces on its axis of rotation. It is a crucial aspect of rocket propulsion as it determines the direction and stability of the rocket's flight.

2. How is torque provided by a rocket's thrust calculated?

The torque provided by a rocket's thrust is calculated by multiplying the force of the rocket's thrust by the distance between the thrust vector and the axis of rotation. This distance is known as the moment arm and is typically measured in meters.

3. What factors affect the torque provided by a rocket's thrust?

The factors that affect the torque provided by a rocket's thrust include the amount of thrust produced, the direction of the thrust vector, and the distance between the thrust vector and the axis of rotation. Additionally, the shape and design of the rocket, as well as external forces like wind, can also impact the torque provided by the thrust.

4. Why is torque provided by a rocket's thrust important in rocket design?

The torque provided by a rocket's thrust is important in rocket design because it determines the stability and control of the rocket during flight. If the torque is not balanced or properly directed, the rocket can experience unwanted rotations or even become uncontrollable. Engineers must carefully consider torque when designing a rocket to ensure safe and efficient flight.

5. How does torque provided by a rocket's thrust affect the rocket's trajectory?

The torque provided by a rocket's thrust affects the rocket's trajectory by determining its direction and stability. If the torque is not balanced or properly directed, the rocket's trajectory can deviate from its intended path. This is why precise calculations and adjustments are necessary to achieve the desired trajectory for a rocket.

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