Troubleshooting nuclear decay, electron binding energies, internal contributions

In summary, there is some confusion about the binding energy shells used in a solution, with the correct values being K and L for the binding energies, not L1 and L2 as previously mentioned. The restriction to omit electrons lower than 20kev is also unclear, as the given binding energies are all in the hundreds of keV range. It appears that there may be some typos in the given information.
  • #1
Graham87
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Homework Statement
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Relevant Equations
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How do you know which binding energy shell to use? In the solution it uses K and L2. Why specifically L2 and not L3 or L1 for example?

And what should I do with the information to omit electrons lower than 20kev? I initially thought that meant to omit the electron binding energies lower than 20kev. But L2 which is lower than 20kev is included, so which expression represents electron energy? If it is ΔE - B(L) then shouldn’t L3 be included since it also has a higher energy than 20kev?

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  • #2
My guess is that there are some typos as indicated below:
1683822652238.png

The ##L_1## should be ##K## and the ##L_2##'s should just be ##L##. This corresponds with the given binding energies:

1683822987537.png


Perhaps the value ##B(L)_{Hg} = 14.2087## keV is a weighted average over the ##L_1##, ##L_2##, and ##L_3## levels.

I'm not sure about the 20 keV restriction. Since ##\overline E_\beta##, ##B(K)_{Hg}## and ##B(L)_{Hg}## are all in the hundreds of keV, there doesn't appear to be any need to worry about requiring the electrons to have an energy greater than 20 keV.
 
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1. What causes nuclear decay?

Nuclear decay is caused by unstable nuclei that have an excess of either protons or neutrons. In order to become more stable, these nuclei release energy in the form of radiation, which can take the form of alpha particles, beta particles, or gamma rays.

2. How do you troubleshoot nuclear decay?

To troubleshoot nuclear decay, scientists typically use mathematical models and experimental data to predict and analyze the decay process. This can involve identifying the type of decay, determining the half-life of the element, and calculating the decay rate.

3. What are electron binding energies?

Electron binding energies refer to the amount of energy required to remove an electron from an atom's outermost shell. This energy is influenced by factors such as the number of protons in the nucleus, the distance between the electron and nucleus, and the shielding effect of other electrons.

4. How do internal contributions affect nuclear decay?

Internal contributions, such as the spin and parity of the nucleus, can affect the rate of nuclear decay. These factors can determine the stability of the nucleus and the likelihood of it undergoing decay. Additionally, internal contributions can affect the type of decay that occurs.

5. What is the significance of understanding nuclear decay and electron binding energies?

Understanding nuclear decay and electron binding energies is crucial for a variety of scientific fields, including nuclear physics, chemistry, and medicine. It allows us to better understand the behavior of atoms and their stability, as well as the potential applications of radioactive materials and radiation in various industries.

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