1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Use math induction to prove an expanded integral.

  1. Sep 15, 2008 #1
    I am in intro to real analysis I, and we're on math induction now.

    I did okay with math induction when I took discrete math, but it's more complex now.

    Here is what we have to prove:

    http://answerboard.cramster.com/advanced-math-topic-5-317406-0.aspx

    I'm quite lost. I will try to do as much as I can and see how far I get on my own.

    Thank you.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 15, 2008 #2
    Just start by integrating by parts. First see what happenes when n=1. Use integration by parts, and see whether you get the same thing as on the RHS. After that suppose that the equation holds for n, and prove that it holds also for n+1, by integrating again by parts, and using your induction hypothesis.
     
  4. Sep 18, 2008 #3
    I think I got it now. Thanks!

    (How can I close this thread now that the question's been resolved?)
     
  5. Sep 18, 2008 #4
    i dont know ,but just leave it like this...it won't be a problem.
     
  6. Sep 19, 2008 #5
    thanks

    ok, thanks.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: Use math induction to prove an expanded integral.
Loading...