Using a Squirrel Cage Motor in an Induction Generator

  • #1
I'm not sure whether to post here or EE forum, if it is better suited there, please advise/assist in moving it.

I'm familiar enough with Induction, though not practiced in the formulae describing it. I recently came into need of an AC generator and thought there has to be some useful household items I could use to construct one without having to wind a bunch of coils. I did a Google search for Induction Generator and came up with this page:

http://www.qsl.net/ns8o/Induction_Generator.html

First off, Is this correct? Second the motor I'm looking at doesn't appear to have the same cylindrical casing as just about ever image I've seen Google image searching "squirrel cage motor". The one I have comes from an older Kenmore Dryer. It looks like this one:

http://www.repairclinic.com/PartDetail/Motor/W10396039/2304840

Is this a different style of motor? I've been trying to find ways to identify one from another, and not much luck besides descriptions where I'd need to dismantle it to really tell. It does appear similar, but not exactly like a few pictures of "Universal Motor" types I've seen. So how do I determine which it is, and would it be possible to use this type in an Induction Generator utilizing the same basic principals, attaching to a small gas powered engine, providing some simple circuit (like the capacitor/chains noted in the first link), and winding up with a 120/240v AC generator?

Thanks
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Baluncore
Science Advisor
2019 Award
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If the motor has brushes, and windings on the rotor it is probably NOT an induction motor.
Very few induction motors do have a wound armature, which is connected through brushes to external variable resistors, in order to control torque.

Under full load an induction motor runs at about 5% below synchronous speed. Look at the speed and frequency specified on the motor specification plate to identify the slip %.

The frequency generated will be when the external capacitors are resonant with the winding inductance of the motor. To generate, the motor must be spun at above the resonant = synchronous speed. The motor will need to be driven about 5% faster than synchronous speed for maximum output as a generator.
 

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