Using water to create electric energy

In summary, there are several ways to use a small amount of water to create enough electric current to heat a small heater bar or warm up. These include converting gravitational potential energy, using a heat engine, nuclear fusion, and capturing kinetic energy. Another option is to offer water to an athlete in exchange for generating electricity on a stationary bicycle.
  • #1
Could a small amount of water be made somehow to create enough electric current to make a small heater bar hot or to even warm up?
 
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  • #2
Without you elaborating more on what your idea is, no.
 
  • #3
Yes. There are several ways it can be done. By "small amount of water" I will suppose you mean 1 gallon since you did specify.

1. Build a cart with a generator attached to 1 or more wheels. Place the cart at the top of a large hill. place your jug of water on the cart. Convert the gravitational potential energy of the water into electricity, and then heat your bar.

2. If the water in question is hotter then some other mass you have access to you could build a heat engine to capture energy moving from the hot water to the cold mass and convert it to electricity. This will also work if you have access to a mass that is hotter then the water, you just need to turn the heat engine around.

3. You could place the water in the core of a star. The heat and pressure will cause the hydrogen and oxygen to undergo nuclear fusion. Place solar panels around the star to capture the energy and turn it into electricity.

4. Place the water in the path of a planet or spacecraft with a high relative velocity. Instruct the inhabitants of the planet or spacecraft to construct an apparatus to convert the energy of impact into electrical energy.

Ok so there are means of extracting gravitational, thermal, nuclear, and kinetic energy from water. I'm sure there are more kinds of energy then that in a gallon of water but that's what comes to mind right now.
 
  • #4
mrspeedybob said:
Yes. There are several ways it can be done. By "small amount of water" I will suppose you mean 1 gallon since you did specify.

1. Build a cart with a generator attached to 1 or more wheels. Place the cart at the top of a large hill. place your jug of water on the cart. Convert the gravitational potential energy of the water into electricity, and then heat your bar.

2. If the water in question is hotter then some other mass you have access to you could build a heat engine to capture energy moving from the hot water to the cold mass and convert it to electricity. This will also work if you have access to a mass that is hotter then the water, you just need to turn the heat engine around.

3. You could place the water in the core of a star. The heat and pressure will cause the hydrogen and oxygen to undergo nuclear fusion. Place solar panels around the star to capture the energy and turn it into electricity.

4. Place the water in the path of a planet or spacecraft with a high relative velocity. Instruct the inhabitants of the planet or spacecraft to construct an apparatus to convert the energy of impact into electrical energy.

Ok so there are means of extracting gravitational, thermal, nuclear, and kinetic energy from water. I'm sure there are more kinds of energy then that in a gallon of water but that's what comes to mind right now.
You forgot. Neils Bohr had one final technique when asked an analogous question about the barometer.
5) Go to a gymnasium. Look for athletes who are resting on the benches. Offer some thirsty athlete a gallon of water if he will work out for five minutes on the stationary bicycle. The generator on the stationary bicycle will generate electrical energy.
 
  • #5


Yes, it is possible to use water to create electric energy through a process called hydroelectric power generation. This involves using the force of moving water to turn turbines, which then power generators to produce electricity. While a small amount of water may not be enough to produce a significant amount of electricity, it is possible to use smaller-scale hydroelectric systems to power devices such as small heaters or to provide heat. Additionally, there are other methods of converting water into electricity, such as using fuel cells, which could potentially be used to power a small heater bar. However, the feasibility and efficiency of these methods would depend on various factors such as the availability of resources and the specific design and technology used. Overall, while it is possible to use water to create electric energy, the amount and effectiveness of the energy produced would depend on the specific application and technology used.
 

1. How does using water create electric energy?

Water can be used to create electric energy through a process called hydropower. This involves capturing the energy of moving water, such as a river or waterfall, and converting it into electricity using turbines and generators.

2. What are the advantages of using water to create electric energy?

One major advantage of using water to create electric energy is that it is a renewable resource, meaning it can be replenished naturally and will not run out. It is also a clean source of energy, as it does not produce air pollution or greenhouse gas emissions.

3. Are there any disadvantages to using water for electric energy?

One disadvantage is that the construction of hydropower facilities can have negative impacts on the environment, such as altering natural habitats and disrupting fish migration. Additionally, not all areas have access to suitable water resources for hydropower.

4. How much electric energy can be generated from water?

The amount of electric energy that can be generated from water depends on factors such as the flow rate and height of the water source, as well as the efficiency of the turbines and generators. On average, a hydropower plant can generate enough electricity to power thousands of homes.

5. Is using water for electric energy cost-effective?

In general, hydropower is considered to be a cost-effective source of electricity. While the initial construction costs can be high, the ongoing operational costs are relatively low. Additionally, since water is a renewable resource, there are no fuel costs associated with using it to generate electricity.

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