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Very restricted in undergrad options, need advice!

  • Thread starter jonq1987
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Aside from some math courses I would be missing, would this degree suffice to get me into an electric engineering prog or something similar?

http://www.apu.apus.edu/academic/programs/degree/1278/bachelor-of-science-in-information-technology [Broken]
 
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I would say no, considering it's not an engineering program, and it's not accredited by ABET, and like you said, you'd be missing tons of math (and physics for that matter). Also, it's online, so that drops its worth significantly. Total waste of thirty grand.
 
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http://www.abet.org/AccredProgramSearch/AccreditationSearch.aspx [Broken]

good luck finding your new engineering program and dropping the 30k online program
 
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I would say no, considering it's not an engineering program, and it's not accredited by ABET, and like you said, you'd be missing tons of math (and physics for that matter). Also, it's online, so that drops its worth significantly. Total waste of thirty grand.
http://www.abet.org/AccredProgramSearch/AccreditationSearch.aspx [Broken]

good luck finding your new engineering program and dropping the 30k online program
Ok so my honor society told me to go to drexel university online as it is both accredited and has a very good reputation. So here is the program: http://www.drexel.com/online-degrees/bachelors-degrees/bs-gs-tech/curriculum.aspx


Since I am restricted to online schooling due to my obligations I figured I could get this degree and take the small amount of math and science I'm missing at the community college and apply for the MS in electrical computer engineering AND software engineering programs at embry since by what they say on their site i would have met their reqs. (not ABET accredited but similar program. thoughts? thanks.
 
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Again, that program has essentially nothing to do with electrical engineering. I get the distinct impression you don't know what electrical engineering is or what it entails. Please learn more about your major before throwing away years of your life into an online rubbish degree.
 
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I understand what it is but embry accepts people on contingent basis if youre missing anything else when you apply. Also online degrees are not all rubbish, there are many good schools out there like nova and fsu that have online degrees. There are some that are worthless but maybe YOU should do some research as well, not only are many online degrees on par but when you graduate it doesnt even say you went online it just says the name of the school so you may be working with former online students you respect and dont even know it.
 
If Embry accepts people on contingent basis, then you'll have to make up the coursework you should know. That constitutes approximately the entirety of your bachelors degree. You won't know how to engineer anything. You won't know the math or the physics necessary to even start. You'll be a web designer, which is what that online program is intended to mold you into. If you're going to make up an entire bachelors degree just to get a masters, you might as well skip to the end and go for an electrical engineering bachelors from an accredited university -- and that means doing it in a physical setting. I'm sorry you have obligations to the contrary, but there's simply no way you'll see the inside of a grad school in electrical engineering with the programs you're asking about.
 
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Well there is one online elec eng prog at an accredited univ at devry but its insanely expensive and has a shady rep. At least drexel is accredited and well known. Should i just do software eng then? I wanna do eng amd im not partial to any specific field. I love being on a computer no matter what im doing with it lol
 
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No one is saying online degrees are rubbish. Well... actually, ABET is. Since they give the permission slip to work as an engineer, you must do as they say.

I understand your situation, but you must understand: physical attendance is necessary in engineering classes and its pre-requisites (math and physics). Therefore, either pay the expensive tuition at devry or another online degree school.

The degrees you have linked all seem like telecommunication maintenance jobs given to Indians for tech support.

Look specifically for "Electrical Engineering BS" or whatever engineering field you choose. I think Devry offers Engineering BS, which seem too broad in my opinion. Seems like it won't prepare you enough for the FE or PE tests (remember, the degree isn't the only thing you must do).

Do yourself a favor and learn more about different types of engineering fields. Look more in detail at computer engineering, software engineering, electrical engineering, etc. Consider if you really want to go down this path and willing to pay the tuition. Ask yourself if you will be comfortable with this career.

I say this because so far, you are saying stuff like: Well whatever I can get, as long as I can tell people I'm an engineer...
 

mege

The business/IT degrees that you keep listing are significantly different than an Engineering degree of any sort. You may be able to get into a 'software engineering' position (programmer, developer, many names same game) with the computer language skills you could learn, but definately not an 'Electrical Engineering' job working with DSP/IC/etc development.

Maybe the better question to ask is: what are you looking to do, specifically? Try not to use the name of a degree in your description if possible.
 
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My suggestion, if you are unable to take in-person classes at the moment, is to do the Math and CompSci courses you can from a distance, from a reputable school. You will not get an whole engineering degree this way, but you will have a number of the important courses done so that you can enter a proper engineering School at some point in the future. Math and CS are subjects that you can do at a distance, Physics and Engineering are not. However, any distance course that is not garbage will be much harder than a normal course.

I am more familiar with programs in Canada, but Athabasca is recognized in the US as well. They have some solid Math and CS courses, but you will need to double-check that your "institution of choice" in the future will accept the credits. This goes for any distance courses - do your research.

http://www2.athabascau.ca/course/ug_subject/cd.php#comp

Thompson Rivers in BC also has some solid Math courses:

http://www.tru.ca/distance/courses/math1141.html
http://www.tru.ca/distance/courses/math1241.html
http://www.tru.ca/distance/courses/math2111.html
http://www.tru.ca/distance/courses/math2121.html

I know of a few other non-scam distance programs, but I don't have any first-hand experience with them:

http://www.uccs.edu/~mathonline/reginfo.html [Broken]
http://www.dcs.wisc.edu/lsa/indlearn/math.htm [Broken]
http://netmath.uiuc.edu/

UCCS does have video lectures on the web, so that might be a plus for them.
 
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No one is saying online degrees are rubbish. Well... actually, ABET is. Since they give the permission slip to work as an engineer, you must do as they say.
University of North Dakota has an ABET-accredited EE degree. (http://distance.und.edu/)
Old Dominion University (http://www.et.odu.edu/eet.html [Broken])
Rochester Institute of Technology (http://distancelearning.rit.edu [Broken])
Excelsior College (http://www.excelsior.edu)

All of these colleges have some residential component to meet ABET requirements.

Also for some reputable schools that are starting EE programs.

SUNY has an EE degree under way (http://le.suny.edu/ [Broken])
University of Washington Bothell (http://www.uwb.edu/ee)

One thing that you have to be careful here is that there are a lot of bad online schools, but there are also some good ones out there. The standard reference for this thing is John Bear and www.degreeinfo.com

http://www.angelfire.com/de3/electronicbsdegree/
 
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My suggestion, if you are unable to take in-person classes at the moment, is to do the Math and CompSci courses you can from a distance, from a reputable school. You will not get an whole engineering degree this way, but you will have a number of the important courses done so that you can enter a proper engineering School at some point in the future. Math and CS are subjects that you can do at a distance, Physics and Engineering are not. However, any distance course that is not garbage will be much harder than a normal course.

I am more familiar with programs in Canada, but Athabasca is recognized in the US as well. They have some solid Math and CS courses, but you will need to double-check that your "institution of choice" in the future will accept the credits. This goes for any distance courses - do your research.

http://www2.athabascau.ca/course/ug_subject/cd.php#comp

Thompson Rivers in BC also has some solid Math courses:

http://www.tru.ca/distance/courses/math1141.html
http://www.tru.ca/distance/courses/math1241.html
http://www.tru.ca/distance/courses/math2111.html
http://www.tru.ca/distance/courses/math2121.html

I know of a few other non-scam distance programs, but I don't have any first-hand experience with them:

http://www.uccs.edu/~mathonline/reginfo.html [Broken]
http://www.dcs.wisc.edu/lsa/indlearn/math.htm [Broken]
http://netmath.uiuc.edu/

UCCS does have video lectures on the web, so that might be a plus for them.
No one is saying online degrees are rubbish. Well... actually, ABET is. Since they give the permission slip to work as an engineer, you must do as they say.

I understand your situation, but you must understand: physical attendance is necessary in engineering classes and its pre-requisites (math and physics). Therefore, either pay the expensive tuition at devry or another online degree school.

The degrees you have linked all seem like telecommunication maintenance jobs given to Indians for tech support.

Look specifically for "Electrical Engineering BS" or whatever engineering field you choose. I think Devry offers Engineering BS, which seem too broad in my opinion. Seems like it won't prepare you enough for the FE or PE tests (remember, the degree isn't the only thing you must do).

Do yourself a favor and learn more about different types of engineering fields. Look more in detail at computer engineering, software engineering, electrical engineering, etc. Consider if you really want to go down this path and willing to pay the tuition. Ask yourself if you will be comfortable with this career.

I say this because so far, you are saying stuff like: Well whatever I can get, as long as I can tell people I'm an engineer...
Well Devry's program is specifically EE, but everyone keeps saying the school is crap despite its regional AND ABET accreditation. I am not saying anything like "Well whatever I can get, as long as I can tell people I'm an engineer" All I said was that I love computers so anything in either EE, CE, or SE will do. I didn't say I was going to be a civil eng, or aero, I am being specific to my interests. I guess I'm screwed then, I'll keep looking. Thanks
 
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What about community college?
Soon or later you would need to get into a physical class. I honestly don't see how it is to become an EE if you haven't done the laboratory part physically.
I understand your situation - you have obligations which hinder you from going to a school. But if you really want to become an engineer (software engineer is a whole different story here), you should enrolled in a school physically. Furthermore, if you want to find a job you probably want to go to a school that can offer you some kinds of career assistance. You have to get a job later. I am not sure how many EE companies will hire someone who obtain her degree from an online program.

CpE is not always half CS half EE. If I am corrected, Georgia Tech, for example, is more EE-sided.
Where do you live? Maybe the members from your area can help you.

What kind of obligations?

Software engineering is a whole different story because it isn't fully CS. SE is a very misleading title. Do you consider the web programmer a software engineer? No. But people who actually write the web framework are considered "software engineers". It depends on what do you want to do. Do you want to write a web framework? Do you want to join Google / Facebook /Micosoft / IBM? Do you want to write hardware drivers? Are you more interested in mobile applications? What exactly is your interest? These things will lead to a decision of whether you should look for a software engineering degree or CS. Some schools DO offer software engineering degree over CS, and CS is only a common gateway to become a software engineer.
 
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Soon or later you would need to get into a physical class. I honestly don't see how it is to become an EE if you haven't done the laboratory part physically.
The online degrees usually require you to go to the university for a short time to do the lab component.

I am not sure how many EE companies will hire someone who obtain her degree from an online program.
Since the HR people often get their degrees from online programs, I don't see this to be a problem. The big problem is how not to get ripped off. If you have a decent degree, people won't care where and how you got it.

Do you consider the web programmer a software engineer? No. But people who actually write the web framework are considered "software engineers"
And that can be quite justified. There are many different levels of web programming. There is create an html page on facebook, and then there is being part of a team that maintains ten million source code lines of code web applications for online banking or airline reservation systems.

Some schools DO offer software engineering degree over CS, and CS is only a common gateway to become a software engineer.
On the other hand, the degree is merely a tool. The software industry tends not to care where you get your computer knowledge, only that you get your computer knowledge, and some of the best programmers I've met have are self-taught. ABET certification is important for some types of engineering, but I've never met an employer that cared if your CS degree was ABET accredited, or if you had a CS degree at all.
 
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What about community college?
Soon or later you would need to get into a physical class. I honestly don't see how it is to become an EE if you haven't done the laboratory part physically.
I understand your situation - you have obligations which hinder you from going to a school. But if you really want to become an engineer (software engineer is a whole different story here), you should enrolled in a school physically. Furthermore, if you want to find a job you probably want to go to a school that can offer you some kinds of career assistance. You have to get a job later. I am not sure how many EE companies will hire someone who obtain her degree from an online program.

CpE is not always half CS half EE. If I am corrected, Georgia Tech, for example, is more EE-sided.
Where do you live? Maybe the members from your area can help you.

What kind of obligations?

Software engineering is a whole different story because it isn't fully CS. SE is a very misleading title. Do you consider the web programmer a software engineer? No. But people who actually write the web framework are considered "software engineers". It depends on what do you want to do. Do you want to write a web framework? Do you want to join Google / Facebook /Micosoft / IBM? Do you want to write hardware drivers? Are you more interested in mobile applications? What exactly is your interest? These things will lead to a decision of whether you should look for a software engineering degree or CS. Some schools DO offer software engineering degree over CS, and CS is only a common gateway to become a software engineer.
Thanks for the input, yea I decided to focus on software and computer engineering. I contacted Embry Riddle and sent them the curriculum from Drexel U for the BS in Computing Technology and they said they would accept me and just have me make up the math and science classes I'm missing before doing grad courses. And as for the obligations, i help my sister with her kids as a live in "Manny" so I basically am home bound since I have to watch them, put them to bed, etc. Also our car was totaled so we have no transportation and we are all working as many hours as we can in between all that. I figure I can go to school while I'm stuck at home.

This is what we discussed

Drexel U BS: http://www.drexel.com/online-degrees/bachelors-degrees/bs-gs-tech/curriculum.aspx

Embry riddle MS: http://www.erau.edu/db/degrees/ma-softwareeng.html [Broken]

http://www.erau.edu/db/degrees/ms-electrical-computer-engineering.html [Broken] (the computer track not electrical)
 
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Since the HR people often get their degrees from online programs, I don't see this to be a problem. The big problem is how not to get ripped off. If you have a decent degree, people won't care where and how you got it.
That being said, if OP has obligations that keep him from attending a class physically, what is the odd that he will be able to get an internship? I know internship is not all that necessary, but consider how many new EE graduates are added to the market each year. I'd say OP has to sort out the obligation. What kind? Raising a family?

And that can be quite justified. There are many different levels of web programming. There is create an html page on facebook, and then there is being part of a team that maintains ten million source code lines of code web applications for online banking or airline reservation systems.
Very true. MVC. The graphic and template one aren't "software engineers". You clarified my point. Thanks.

On the other hand, the degree is merely a tool. The software industry tends not to care where you get your computer knowledge, only that you get your computer knowledge, and some of the best programmers I've met have are self-taught. ABET certification is important for some types of engineering, but I've never met an employer that cared if your CS degree was ABET accredited, or if you had a CS degree at all.
What matter is what does he want out of the degree? Going to a traditional CS program may not interest him. Maybe he would find applied mathematics more interesting. Maybe he find CpE more promising than a regular CS. It is also very true that CS ABET is not necessary at all.

If he just wants to make money he can start learning programming right now. Learn Python, and then learn Django or Pylon. He can be a freelancer, and when he earns enough experience he can apply to a Django company. These are alternatives.
 
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I am not saying anything like "Well whatever I can get, as long as I can tell people I'm an engineer" All I said was that I love computers so anything in either EE, CE, or SE will do.
If all you want to do is work with Computers, why the obsession with a degree that says Engineering in the title? As said by others above, you don't need ABET certification to get hired doing programming. Also, why do you need a Master's degree? Wouldn't one degree be enough if all you wanted to do was get into the field quickly?

If you don't have any experience with writing software yet, take one half-decent online programming course to get your feet wet and see what you are getting yourself into.
 
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SUNY has an EE degree under way
I found the link here:
http://beeol.ee.sunysb.edu/

While I hear that SUNY is a reputable school and I have no first-hand experience with any of their programs, I would just hope that it is more rigorous than the distance BSc in "Applied Mathematics" shown here:

http://www.esc.edu/ESConline/Across_ESC/sampledps.nsf/C0A17612CFB3F00085256C5B00609E55/5F246CB3F078A96385256F19006986B2?OpenDocument

That has to be the weakest Math degree I have ever seen. Thankfully, the EE program looks more serious.
 
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If all you want to do is work with Computers, why the obsession with a degree that says Engineering in the title? As said by others above, you don't need ABET certification to get hired doing programming. Also, why do you need a Master's degree? Wouldn't one degree be enough if all you wanted to do was get into the field quickly?

If you don't have any experience with writing software yet, take one half-decent online programming course to get your feet wet and see what you are getting yourself into.
Well it wasn't so much that it had to say engineering in the title, but rather that it would transfer well to grad school. And I want the Masters after some time in the field for more education and money of course! It's just how I was raised, my mom always told me to go all the way. So if I get a BS and I see there's an MS I'm definitely going for it, and maybe even a PhD later on.
 
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Your PhD won't make you rich. It's a miserable thing that so many people are going to PhD because they think it makes them smarter and more valuable.
Programmers don't really need BS. But if you want to work for a big company, yeah, sure you need a BS. It's a requirement.

I think for most people a master is good enough (non-thesis). PhD is really for someone who is interested in doing research (both academia and private) type of work. It is something that I am also worried about. Do I really want to pursue a PhD. I think for now I am going to explore my options and maybe work a year or two before deciding my graduate admission.

SUNY is a great system. Stony Brook is an excellent school. The tuition charge is still very affordable for non-resident... If you are NYS resident that's even better.
 
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Your PhD won't make you rich. It's a miserable thing that so many people are going to PhD because they think it makes them smarter and more valuable.
Programmers don't really need BS. But if you want to work for a big company, yeah, sure you need a BS. It's a requirement.

I think for most people a master is good enough (non-thesis). PhD is really for someone who is interested in doing research (both academia and private) type of work. It is something that I am also worried about. Do I really want to pursue a PhD. I think for now I am going to explore my options and maybe work a year or two before deciding my graduate admission.

SUNY is a great system. Stony Brook is an excellent school. The tuition charge is still very affordable for non-resident... If you are NYS resident that's even better.
I'm not looking to be rich, I just want to have a complete education. If there is more out there that I do not know I want to learn it and have the credentials to match.
 
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Well it wasn't so much that it had to say engineering in the title, but rather that it would transfer well to grad school.
If you have work experience, then there are a ton of online professional masters programs out there.

It's just how I was raised, my mom always told me to go all the way. So if I get a BS and I see there's an MS I'm definitely going for it, and maybe even a PhD later on.
Education is great, but you can sometimes get more useful education in an office than a university. Also one thing about software development is there are lots of people with little/no formal education in programming that are outstanding programmers, and a lot of people with CS Ph.D.'s that make miserable programmers.
 
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Programmers don't really need BS. But if you want to work for a big company, yeah, sure you need a BS. It's a requirement.
But people don't care what your Bachelor is in. If you have a Bachelors in Russian Literature, but you taught yourself programming, you can get by.
 

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