Voltage between two different charges

In summary, the voltage of a capacitor is equal to the charge divided by the capacitance. However, if there are two different charges involved, the voltage can be calculated by finding the electric field and using it in the equation V=-\int \vec E d \vec l. The electric field may depend on the type and shape of the capacitor.
  • #1
LiteHacker
18
0
Voltage = Charge / Capacitance.

This assumes that the capacitor has +Q charge on one side and -Q charge on the other side.

What if you have two different charges?

I mean in terms of static electricity, if you have a piece of metal with one charge, and another piece of metal with another charge, the capacitance between them depends on their distance from each other and their volume... But they have two different charges.

How do you find the voltage?

Thank you,
Veniamin
 
Last edited:
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  • #2
I think by using the formula [tex]V=-\int \vec E d \vec l[/tex] so you'd have to calculate the electric field of the charged capacitor.
 
  • #3
fluidistic said:
I think by using the formula [tex]V=-\int \vec E d \vec l[/tex] so you'd have to calculate the electric field of the charged capacitor.

Indeed, after spending a while on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capacitor#Parallel_plate_model", I found that E = +- charge density / some constant ..
It goes on taking the integral of E * something = Voltage

But, I don't understand what E equals if you have two different charge densities.

Does anybody?

Note that it seems safe to assume that charge is proportional charge density, so we are still trying to figure out the original problem:
What voltage do you get based on two different charges?
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #4
LiteHacker said:
Indeed, after spending a while on http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capacitor#Parallel_plate_model", I found that E = +- charge density / some constant ..
It goes on taking the integral of E * something = Voltage

But, I don't understand what E equals if you have two different charge densities.

Does anybody?

Note that it seems safe to assume that charge is proportional charge density, so we are still trying to figure out the original problem:
What voltage do you get based on two different charges?
You'd have to find out [tex]\vec E[/tex], I believe but not 100% sure. This value may depends on the type of capacitor and its shape.
I'll wait someone else to enlighten us.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Related to Voltage between two different charges

1. What is the definition of voltage between two different charges?

Voltage between two different charges, also known as potential difference, is the difference in electric potential energy per unit charge between two points in an electric field.

2. How is voltage between two different charges calculated?

Voltage can be calculated by dividing the work done by the electric field on a charge by the amount of charge, or by multiplying the electric field strength by the distance between the two points.

3. What units are used to measure voltage between two different charges?

Voltage is measured in volts (V) in the SI system of units. In other systems, it can also be expressed in units such as joules per coulomb (J/C) or newtons per coulomb (N/C).

4. How does the distance between two charges affect the voltage between them?

As the distance between two charges increases, the voltage between them decreases. This is because the electric field strength decreases with distance, resulting in a smaller potential difference.

5. What is the relationship between voltage between two different charges and electric potential energy?

Voltage and electric potential energy are directly proportional. This means that as the voltage between two charges increases, the electric potential energy also increases. Similarly, a decrease in voltage results in a decrease in electric potential energy.

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