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Volume of water rainfall problem

  1. Sep 4, 2006 #1
    what would the volume of water covering a 640 acre area be after 1 inch of rainfall?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 4, 2006 #2

    rbj

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    640 acre-inches?
     
  4. Sep 4, 2006 #3

    DaveC426913

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    Surely it takes more time to write the post and wait for a response than to just figure it out on your own...

    Or are you doing your homework during commercials? :rolleyes:
     
  5. Sep 4, 2006 #4
    You know, this isn't hard math, unless you're in second grade or something. Actually, second graders probably can do this now. Anyway, the answer is 1.57828283 × 10^-5 cubic miles.
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2006
  6. Sep 4, 2006 #5

    rbj

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    spoon-feeder.:grumpy:

    or, maybe, if it's numerically incorrect (i didn't check), spoon-feeding a wrong numerical answer is the best medicine.
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2006
  7. Sep 5, 2006 #6
    Sorry.:redface:

    No, it's correct. I thought about giving him/her the wrong answer, but didn't. I've gone back and edited it to only leave the figure in cubic miles. That way I'm neither lying nor giving them an answer that won't raise an eyebrow with the teacher.

    ETA, oh, blast, you've got my original post quoted, so my devious plan won't work.
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2006
  8. Sep 5, 2006 #7

    J77

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    They're hardly SI though :biggrin:
     
  9. Sep 5, 2006 #8

    rcgldr

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    Zero, it all soaked into the ground, or flowed away.
     
  10. Sep 5, 2006 #9

    Chi Meson

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    You know, that's valid!:rolleyes:
    but convert acres into square meters and inches into meters first, then combine thiem to find cubic meters. (Divide that by 1000 to get liters).
     
  11. Sep 5, 2006 #10
    Well, acres and inches aren't SI, hectares and centimeters are. He/she said acres and inches in the OP.
     
  12. Sep 5, 2006 #11
    Hmm, now that would depend on the permeability of the soil. :wink:
     
  13. Sep 5, 2006 #12

    Danger

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    Also upon the terrain. Unless it's walled in, the water won't be confined to the initial saturation area.
     
  14. Sep 6, 2006 #13

    J77

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    No they're not.

    They can only be given, exactly in terms of an SI unit.
     
  15. Sep 6, 2006 #14

    rcgldr

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    Acre-feet is a common term for large amounts of water, usually behind a dam. So if 1 inch water fell into a 640 acre water tight basin, you'd have 53 1/3 (640/12) acre-feet, or 2323209.6 (53.3333... x 43560.18) ft^3 of water.
     
  16. Sep 6, 2006 #15

    Bystander

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    What's that in duman-furlongs?
     
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