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Want to be a multibody expert, looking for tips

  1. Oct 21, 2013 #1
    Hi all,

    I want to be a multibody expert. How could you do that? Is there any book you suggest me to read? Which sw do you suggest me to learn? Any suggestion is appreciated.

    Thanks
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 21, 2013 #2

    Simon Bridge

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    Multi body expert?
    An expert in multi-body what?

    All engineering is "multi-body" so you'll have to be more specific.
    Where abouts are you in your education?
     
  4. Oct 21, 2013 #3
    I meant "multi-body simulation". I'm a mechanical engineer and I do simple multibody simulation but anytime sometime I loose a lot of time in correcting my models because I get some unexpected numerical errors and I don't have any idea how to fix them. So I want to improve my skills in it.
     
  5. Oct 21, 2013 #4

    Simon Bridge

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    Oh well, then you want to learn about "numerical modelling" for the grounding.
    Then you need to apply it to the specific kind of multi-body simulation you want to do.
     
  6. Oct 21, 2013 #5

    D H

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    The standard approach is to take a mechanical engineering class in multibody dynamics. Or two classes. It's a complex subject. It's a yearlong class in many schools.
     
  7. Oct 21, 2013 #6
    thanks, is there any reference material I should study?
     
  8. Oct 21, 2013 #7
    Unfortunately I already work, so I can't take classes anymore. I have to study it on my own. :(
     
  9. Oct 21, 2013 #8

    Simon Bridge

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    If there is a college class named "multibody dynamics" or similar, then it will be the bare minimum that you need to become expert. By itself the class can get you to the "functional" level from which you just need experience to get "competent".

    I understand you cannot actually attend classes :) but that does not mean you cannot do the course.
    You want to be an "expert" and that means being prepared to go the extra mile. If you just want to know about it as a hobby, that is a different proposition.

    Find out what the text book is and see if you can get hold of the regular assignments... use your initiative.
    There will also be other courses that go with that one - find out what they are: the college prospectus should help - they are online these days. You could also contact students, find out who takes good notes and ask them to get you a copy.

    A lot of colleges put their lectures online - have you looked?

    If you are not prepared to put in this sort of work, then you probably won't become "expert".
    But you could become "knowledgeable".
     
  10. Oct 21, 2013 #9

    D H

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    There is no rule that says your education must stop when you leave college for the working world. Do you work in an even somewhat related technical field? Does your employer provide educational benefits? If the answer to the first question is yes and the second no, this is a sign that it might be time to look for a new employer.

    Many schools have a class with this exact name. In others, it's a major part of a class called "advanced dynamics", or "analytical dynamics", or something similar. Multibody dynamics is a subfield of mechanical engineering (with crossover to aerospace engineering). Look at all the books on this one subject: https://www.google.com/search?q=multibody+dynamics&tbm=bks


    serbring: One text that is not on the above list is Analytical Dynamics by Haim Baruh.
     
  11. Oct 22, 2013 #10
    Thanks for your reply, What I meant is that I can't follow classes but I can study what I need.

    I have tons of online material and books, so I posted here to have a suggestion from experienced people about books to read or exercises to do in order to understand very well multibody dynamics.
     
  12. Oct 22, 2013 #11
    I totally agree, I study almost everyday in order to improve my skill.

    Have you used any of those books?
     
  13. Oct 22, 2013 #12
    I work close to the University and the book analytical dynamics, there are many solved examples. I was looking for a book like that. Thanks
     
  14. Oct 22, 2013 #13

    Simon Bridge

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    And what you got was suggestions for how to figure out which materials to concentrate on. :)

    Happy hunting.
     
  15. Oct 22, 2013 #14
    Thanks!!! :)
     
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