Wear rates and friction of plastics

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In summary, there are various plastic materials that can be used as a replacement for brass and steel sleeves and cylinders with ceramic tips. Some options include Delrin, Nylon, PTFE, UHMWPE, and PPS, each with different properties that may suit your specific needs.
  • #1
es_shoes
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I am looking to replace a set of brass and steel sleeve and cylinder having a ceramic tip with a plastic sleeve and cylinder having a plastic tip. The only question I have actually has two parts... are there any plastic, machineable materials that have comparable wear rates to that of ceramic? The probe enclosed on this setup works off the Eddy current, so the tip can't be metal. Just wondering if anything pops out at you guys for a strong plastic with good wear rates, and low friction between two layers of that material. Thanks in advance.



Ben
 
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  • #2
ign plastics such as Delrin and Nylon are commonly used for applications with high wear resistance, low friction, and the ability to be machined. PTFE (Teflon) is another option that has excellent wear resistance and low friction, although it is more difficult to machine. Depending on your application, you may want to look into some of the newer engineered plastics, such as ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) or polyphenylene sulfide (PPS). These materials have excellent wear resistance, good strength, and can be machined.
 
  • #3
, thank you for your question. I understand your interest in finding a suitable replacement for the brass and steel components in your setup. The wear rates and friction of plastics can vary greatly depending on the material and specific application, so it is important to carefully consider your options.

In terms of wear rates, there are some plastics that have been shown to have comparable wear rates to ceramics. For example, ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has been used in various industrial applications due to its high wear resistance and low coefficient of friction. However, it is important to note that wear rates can also be affected by factors such as load, temperature, and surface finish, so it is important to thoroughly test any potential replacements in your specific setup.

In terms of machineable plastics, some options to consider may include acetal (POM), nylon, and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). These materials have shown good wear resistance and low friction in various applications. Again, it is important to carefully test and select the most suitable material for your specific setup.

Additionally, there are other factors to consider when replacing metal components with plastic, such as the strength and stiffness requirements of your setup. It may be necessary to modify the design or incorporate reinforcements to ensure the plastic components can withstand the same loads and forces as the metal components.

In summary, there are some plastics that have shown promise in terms of wear rates and friction, but it is important to carefully evaluate and test them in your specific setup to ensure they meet your requirements. I recommend consulting with a materials expert or conducting thorough testing to determine the best option for your application. Best of luck with your research!
 

Related to Wear rates and friction of plastics

1. What is the definition of wear rate?

The wear rate of a plastic material is the measurement of how much material is lost due to friction and abrasion over a given period of time.

2. How is the wear rate of plastic measured?

The wear rate of plastic is typically measured using a tribometer, which applies a controlled amount of force and movement to the material to simulate real-world conditions.

3. What factors affect the wear rate of plastics?

The wear rate of plastics can be affected by factors such as the type and composition of the plastic, the surface finish, the environmental conditions, and the amount and type of applied load or friction.

4. How does friction play a role in the wear rate of plastics?

Friction is a major contributor to the wear rate of plastics. When two surfaces come into contact and rub against each other, friction generates heat and causes material to be worn away.

5. Can the wear rate of plastics be reduced?

Yes, the wear rate of plastics can be reduced through various methods such as using lubricants, altering the surface finish, or choosing a different plastic material with better wear resistance properties. Proper maintenance and design considerations can also help reduce wear rates.

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