Weight vs Mass On Moon and Mars Imperial Units

In summary, an object with a weight of 3.5 lb-f on the moon would have a mass of 3.5 lb-m. On Mars, with a gravity of 12.1 ft/sec^2, the lb-m and lb-f would have different numerical values due to the use of the gravitational constant (gc). The gc for Earth is 32lbm*ft/sec^2, but it varies for other planets. Imperial units can be confusing because the gc is not always used.
  • #1
BigJon
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Homework Statement


Moon's gravity is 5.31ft/sec^2 An object has the weight of 3.5 lb-f on the moon. What is its lb-m
What is the lb-m and lb-f on Mars with gravity of 12.1 ft/sec^2.


Homework Equations


w=mg=mg/gc

gc= gravitational constant----> 32lbm*ft/sec^2 for earth

The Attempt at a Solution


So I understand mass is the same everywhere. Also lb-m and lb-f are the same numerically on Earth but not on other planets?

Im just really confused with imperial units because i don't understand when to use or not use the gc.
 
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  • #2
## 1 \ \text{lbf} = 32.174 \ \frac {\text{ft} \cdot \text{lbm}} {\text{s}^2} ##.
 

1. What is the difference between weight and mass on the moon and Mars in imperial units?

The main difference between weight and mass on the moon and Mars is the strength of their respective gravitational pulls. The moon has a weaker gravitational pull compared to Earth, while Mars has a slightly stronger pull. This means that the weight of an object will be different on the moon and Mars compared to Earth. However, the mass of an object will remain the same, regardless of its location in the universe.

2. How is weight and mass measured on the moon and Mars in imperial units?

Weight is measured in pounds (lbs) on both the moon and Mars, just as it is on Earth. However, the weight of an object will be different due to the different gravitational pulls. Mass is measured in slugs on the moon and pounds (lbs) on Mars, which are both imperial units of mass. It is important to note that the mass of an object will remain the same, regardless of its location in the universe.

3. Is there a difference in the conversion rate for weight on the moon and Mars compared to Earth?

Yes, there is a difference in the conversion rate for weight on the moon and Mars compared to Earth. This is because the gravitational pull on the moon and Mars is different from that of Earth. On the moon, the conversion rate is 1/6th of the weight on Earth, while on Mars it is about 1/3rd of the weight on Earth.

4. How does the weight and mass of an object on the moon and Mars affect its movement and behavior?

The weight and mass of an object on the moon and Mars will affect its movement and behavior in different ways. Due to the weaker gravitational pull on the moon, objects will weigh less and therefore require less force to move. On the other hand, due to the stronger pull on Mars, objects will weigh more and require more force to move. The mass of an object will also affect its movement, as objects with greater mass will require more force to move regardless of the location.

5. Can weight and mass be measured in metric units on the moon and Mars?

Yes, weight and mass can be measured in metric units on the moon and Mars. While imperial units are commonly used in the United States, the metric system is used in most other countries around the world. Weight can be measured in kilograms (kg) and mass can be measured in grams (g) on the moon and Mars, just as they can be on Earth.

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