What elements account for these absorption lines seen?

In summary, the first image is a continuous spectrum while the second image is a discrete spectrum. The second image appears to be blurry, and there may not be any absorption lines present.
  • #1
Luminescent
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Homework Statement
What elements account for these absorption lines seen?..
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  • #2
I can't see any absorption lines at all. If you're thinking about the two big black vertical lines, they are not absorption lines, which would be horizontal (at a particular wavelength) in this picture, not cutting across the spectrum. They are probably something to do with the optics of the spectrometer.
 
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  • #3
mjc123 said:
I can't see any absorption lines at all. If you're thinking about the two big black vertical lines, they are not absorption lines, which would be horizontal (at a particular wavelength) in this picture, not cutting across the spectrum. They are probably something to do with the optics of the spectrometer.
The first image is a continuous spectrum . The second image you believe is a continuous spectrum as well ? ...Where am I going wrong, the first image is pointed at candle flame the second is pointed at an arc flash ... wouldn’t there be absorption lines present in the second image ? What accounts for the thick darker regions? :/
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  • #4
Please don't change your original post (except for minor corrections like typos); now my post seems to make no sense.

What thick darker regions? They both look like continuous spectra. Absorption lines would appear as narrow dark vertical lines. Possibly you haven't got a sharp image of your object, so the spectrum is blurred.
 
  • #5
mjc123 said:
Please don't change your original post (except for minor corrections like typos); now my post seems to make no sense.

What thick darker regions? They both look like continuous spectra. Absorption lines would appear as narrow dark vertical lines. Possibly you haven't got a sharp image of your object, so the spectrum is blurred.
mjc123 said:
Please don't change your original post (except for minor corrections like typos); now my post seems to make no sense.

What thick darker regions? They both look like continuous spectra. Absorption lines would appear as narrow dark vertical lines. Possibly you haven't got a sharp image of your object, so the spectrum is blurred.

Okay noted sorry about that ! I think you’re right I need a better image . Thanks for the help !
 

Related to What elements account for these absorption lines seen?

1. What are absorption lines?

Absorption lines are dark lines that appear in a spectrum of light when certain wavelengths are absorbed by elements in a material. These lines can help identify the elements present in a substance.

2. How are absorption lines created?

Absorption lines are created when electrons in an atom absorb photons of specific wavelengths and transition to higher energy levels. This results in the absorption of those wavelengths, which appear as dark lines in a spectrum.

3. What elements can be identified using absorption lines?

Most elements can be identified using absorption lines, as each element has a unique set of energy levels and therefore produces specific absorption lines. However, highly ionized or unstable elements may not produce distinct lines.

4. What factors affect the strength and location of absorption lines?

The strength and location of absorption lines can be affected by factors such as the temperature and pressure of the material, the composition of the material, and the presence of external magnetic fields.

5. How do scientists use absorption lines to study elements?

Scientists can use absorption lines to study elements by analyzing the wavelengths and strengths of the lines present in a spectrum. This can provide information about the composition and physical properties of the material, such as its temperature, density, and magnetic fields.

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