What Elevation Angle Clears the Wall and Hits the Target?

A better number is 64.6 degrees.In summary, the appropriate elevation angle for a projectile with an initial speed of 20 m/s to hit a target 28.9 m away, with a 10 m high wall placed halfway between, is around 44 degrees, but a more accurate angle is 65 degrees.
  • #1
rsmseys
4
0

Homework Statement



A projectile, initial speed v = 20 m/s is supposed to hit a target D = 28.9 m away. However an H = 10 m high wall is placed halfway between the launching point and the target. What is the appropriate elevation angle? (in degrees).

Homework Equations



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Equations_of_motion#Equations_of_uniformly_accelerated_linear_motion

The Attempt at a Solution



I got the answer of around 44 to 45 degrees. The correct answer is said to be closer to 65 degrees. Any help in clarifying which answer is right would be helpful, along with solutions. Thanks.
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
and how did you reach your answer?

According to PF rules no solns can be given... just help or advice.
 
  • #3
v = at
20sin(x) = 9.8t
20sin(x) / 9.8 = t
s = 1/2(u +v)t
10 = 1/2 * (20sin(x))*(20sin(x))/9.8

Solving for x, the answer for x (the angle) is 44.427 degrees.
 
  • #4
Not quite, but you're on the right track.

Work it backwards with your result and you'll see that although you just cleared the wall, you missed the target by nearly 12m.
 
  • #5


I would first check to make sure that all the given values are accurate and consistent. Then, I would use the equations of motion to solve for the appropriate elevation angle. In this case, we can use the equation y = y0 + v0y * t - 1/2 * g * t^2, where y is the vertical distance, y0 is the initial vertical distance, v0y is the initial vertical velocity, g is the acceleration due to gravity, and t is the time.

First, we can find the time it takes for the projectile to reach the wall by setting y = 10 m and solving for t. This gives us t = 1 second. Then, we can use this time in the equation y = y0 + v0y * t - 1/2 * g * t^2 to solve for the initial vertical velocity, v0y. This gives us v0y = 10 m/s.

Next, we can use the equation x = x0 + v0x * t to solve for the horizontal distance, x0, which is the distance from the launching point to the wall. This gives us x0 = 10 m. Then, we can use this distance and the given distance to the target, D = 28.9 m, to solve for the horizontal velocity, v0x. This gives us v0x = 20.9 m/s.

Finally, we can use the equation tan(theta) = v0y / v0x to solve for the elevation angle, theta. This gives us theta = 28.6 degrees. However, this is the angle at which the projectile would hit the wall. To hit the target, the projectile must travel another 28.9 m after hitting the wall. This means that the total horizontal distance the projectile must travel is 28.9 m + 10 m = 38.9 m. Using this new distance in the equation v0x = x / t, we can solve for the new horizontal velocity, v0x. This gives us v0x = 31.4 m/s.

Finally, we can use this new horizontal velocity and the equation tan(theta) = v0y / v0x to solve for the elevation angle, theta. This gives us theta = 64.5 degrees, which is closer to the given correct answer of 65 degrees.

In conclusion, the
 

Related to What Elevation Angle Clears the Wall and Hits the Target?

1. What is projectile motion with wall?

Projectile motion with wall refers to the motion of an object that is launched or thrown at an angle towards a vertical wall. The object will follow a parabolic path until it hits the wall and bounces off it.

2. How does the wall affect the projectile's motion?

The wall acts as a barrier and changes the direction and velocity of the projectile when it bounces off it. The angle of incidence of the projectile upon hitting the wall will be equal to the angle of reflection.

3. What factors affect the projectile's trajectory when it hits the wall?

The projectile's initial velocity, angle of launch, and the distance between the projectile and the wall are the main factors that affect its trajectory. Other factors such as air resistance, wind, and gravity may also play a role.

4. How can we calculate the final velocity of the projectile after it hits the wall?

The final velocity of the projectile after bouncing off the wall can be calculated using the law of reflection. The angle of incidence and the initial velocity of the projectile can be used to find the final velocity using trigonometric functions.

5. Can we predict the projectile's path after it bounces off the wall?

Yes, we can predict the projectile's path after it bounces off the wall by using the same equations for projectile motion. The projectile will continue to follow a parabolic path, but with a different angle of launch and velocity. Taking into account the effects of air resistance, wind, and gravity can help make more accurate predictions.

Similar threads

  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
4
Views
959
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
8
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
15
Views
1K
Replies
5
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
3K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
22
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
8
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
15
Views
2K
Back
Top