What foods won't you eat?

  • Thread starter Evo
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  • #76
Evo
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OMG...all this time I didn't know peppers had placentas...:surprised ! I've been eating them all along...urg!
Sometimes, it's better not to know. :bugeye:

I've been making the same type of stuffed jalapenos for about 30 years. I have several different stuffings including shrimp and crab stuffed ones. I also stuff the canned ones, the only canned ones I'll use are from Mexico and have bay leaf and garlic in them. The problem is that they are almost impossible to find in the states. :frown: The same company also sells canned stuffed jalapenos, but they're stuffed with tuna, good, but a unique flavor.
 
  • #77
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Liver yeccccch taste and texture. Brussel sprouts are on the list as well. Not too fond of fishy fish, tuna and swordfish are ok. Say no to shellfish. Oh yeah and beets.
 
  • #78
turbo
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Ooh, you just gave me an idea! Jalapeno poppers stuffed with chicken livers and crispy bacon, and topped with Monterey Jack, browned on the grill. I'll have to wrangle a deal on chicken/turkey livers to give this a shot. When my wife and I lived in Bangor shortly after our marriage, we went to Veazie Packing every weekend to buy chicken livers and gizzards and thighs. Their prices were great, because they had a huge local market for wings, drumsticks, breast-meat (lots of restaurants/bars in college towns) and we got to get some of the best chicken parts for pennies on the dollar.
 
  • #79
Evo
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Ooh, you just gave me an idea! Jalapeno poppers stuffed with chicken livers and crispy bacon, and topped with Monterey Jack, browned on the grill.
OMG!!!! Where is that bowing smiley????

That sounds so good, I will start driving now to get there in time to eat those!!!
 
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  • #80
Mk
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I can eat anything.

Except undercooked pancakes that still taste half like flour,

and hummus is disgusting.
 
  • #81
Kurdt
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I can't eat liver or kidney. I once had a steak and kidney pie that I thought was a steak pie. It just tastes like someone has had a wee in your pie. :cry:

Just remembered I don't like italian cheese sauces for pasta, talking of flour.
 
  • #82
turbo
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OMG!!!! Where is that bowing smiley????

That sounds so good, I will start driving now to get there in time to eat those!!!
I am going to get the ingredients for these as soon as my wife can get back on her feet and hit the stores. We have a year's worth of frozen/canned foods laid up (at a minimum) and I'm doing all the cooking for at least a month while she recovers from foot surgery, but I have GOT to make these rascals as soon as I can.

What's wrong with Bobby Flay? Can't he come up with stuff like this? Just a little interplay on a food-related thread, and already, I think I've got something irresistible for an appetizer. It will be lower-fat than the popper with cream cheese and bacon, higher in protein, and certainly better in flavor. I can tweak this if necessary, but the basic recipe sounds killer with maybe tiny jigs and jags.
 
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  • #83
Evo
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I feel so sorry for those that can't tolerate certain textures or flavors. I completely understand that they can't help having these objections. It is just sad (to me) that they can't enjoy such a broad spectrum of flavors and textures. But, of course) to them it is avoiding objectionable things, so to them having a limited choice isn't bad.

Just like I can't eat mangoes, I am sure I am missing out on something other people consider delectable. I wish I could experience that, but I can't.
 
  • #84
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I feel so sorry for those that can't tolerate certain textures or flavors. I completely understand that they can't help having these objections. It is just sad (to me) that they can't enjoy such a broad spectrum of flavors and textures. But, of course) to them it is avoiding objectionable things, so to them having a limited choice isn't bad.

Just like I can't eat mangoes, I am sure I am missing out on something other people consider delectable. I wish I could experience that, but I can't.

YES ME TOO! I dont know why, but when I was younger it would make me gag just by the taste. For some reason, I can probably eat it now. But growing up, no way. It would just make me want to vomit instantly. I dont know why, it just would. Even the smell of it was nasty to me. I did not think it smelled bad, it just made me want to gag.
 
  • #85
DaveC426913
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Just like I can't eat mangoes, I am sure I am missing out on something other people consider delectable. I wish I could experience that, but I can't.
you are to mangoes as I am to coconut milk. It's just . . the wrong place for such a taste.
 
  • #86
Evo
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you are to mangoes as I am to coconut milk. It's just . . the wrong place for such a taste.
I can't stand coconut milk in food either. Almond Joy bars, ok, anything else, not ok.

I wonder if it is more genetic than cultural, since I have no predisposed cultural biases against these foods, but have unknowingly and randomly eaten these things and had the same reactions all times.
 
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  • #87
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You want to know gross? I've eaten huckleberry.
Amazing how fast food threads grow! I wonder why? Am I beautiful?
 
  • #88
Math Is Hard
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Amazing how fast food threads grow! I wonder why? Am I beautiful?

You are delicious. :smile:
 
  • #89
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You are delicious. :smile:
:blushing: I try so hard to be blue and tart, but you say the sweetest things. You make me blush and ruin my complexion.

Huckleberries hold a place in archaic English slang. The tiny size of the berries led to their frequent use as a way of referring to something small, often in an affectionate way. The phrase "a huckleberry over my persimmon" was used to mean "a bit beyond my abilities". "I'm your huckleberry" is a way of saying that one is just the right person for a given job,[1] which was used by the character Doc Holliday in the movie Tombstone. The Huckleberry Railroad is a heritage train located in Flint, Michigan. It ran so slowly that it was said a person could jump off the train, pick huckleberries and jump back on the train with minimum effort. [2]
 
  • #90
lisab
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I can't stand coconut milk in food either. Almond Joy bars, ok, anything else, not ok.

I wonder if it is more genetic than cultural, since I have no predisposed cultural biases against these foods, but have unknowingly and randomly eaten these things and had the same reactions all times.

What about cconut milk in Thai food? It's widely used, in combination with cilantro, peanuts and lime. What a non-Western combination of flavors, and absolutely, unexpectedly delicious!
 
  • #91
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I despise the taste of cilantro.
I cannot stand the texture of cottage cheese.
And I'm queasy about eating the internal organs of any animal. Though liver isn't that bad.
There is also something about Papaya that makes me hate it. But Mangoes are ok.

Psychological:
I have trouble drinking Orange Juice since drinking a little more than a half gallon of it as a 5yr old. I threw up everywhere and really killed my stomach. The taste of it makes my stomach acid boil.

I cannot stand the smell of watermelon. Worked at ABC Warehouse and they gave away watermelons with appliance purchases. As a stockboy at the time I was required to, by hand, dispose of the ones at the bottom of the pallet that happened to turn brown, black and white. I lifted a green one up but my hand sunk into the bottom of it where it was black and white with sick decay. No watermelon for me. The smell triggers.


OH! and the texture of Squash with brown sugar. BLEH!
 
  • #92
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If its already been said, kill me.
Lutefisk
 
  • #93
jim mcnamara
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[sortof science]
Had a nutritionist colleague . His view on likes/dislikes in food bolied down to a largely biological one. The airborne molecules that our olfactory plates find "matches" for and we can detect vary among people. This affects how we perceive and taste foods.
There is also the 'what I ate as a kid' thing, too.

Example: among other things melons have polyalcohols, and some complex aromatic oils.
These contribute a lot to our smelling these foods. Depending on which combinations of these compounds you perceive, you might hate or love cantelope, be blah about watermelon, or throwup at the sight of cucumbers.

A lot smells we perceive as bad are acids - butyric acid is "bad foot smell", some are ammonia-related bases like the bacterial catlysis products of trietylamine in fish - rotten fish odor, some are thiols or sulfides. We can detect these in minute amount - hydrogen sulfide in 1 part per billion for example. Rancid butter is rancid in a large part because of the presence butryric acid.
[/sortof science]

Anyway, if for example, you could not perceive butyric acid, you could easily eat butter that was going bad. I've eaten going-bad butter. It was okay, but kinda piquant.

Anyhow - I can smell virtually nothing. If you pulverize an ounce of rosemary or garlic I can smell it. Sorta. I can also sorta smell smoke - which is good.

Guess what? Nobody in our family uses me as the taste test guinea pig. I eat things by accident that make other people puke. And they do not faze me at all. I've learned not to eat green fuzzy things from the fridge. Dried out pizza is pretty good, chewy though.
Dry-ish bacon is okay if you fry it first. Dry crumbly sour cream, with the blue fuzz removed is also good. Kinda piquant, too.

I don't really like salty foods, but I eat them just fine.

The flip side of this is I do not seem to get dyspepsia or problems in the posterior end of the alimentary canal either. I can clean up vomit or decaying animal carcasses or pet droopings with zero problems. You do not want me as your personal chef, however. :smile:
 
  • #94
jim mcnamara
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PS: green eggs and ham - I will eat them Sam I Am. Call me jimIam.
 
  • #95
lisab
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[sortof science]
Had a nutritionist colleague . His view on likes/dislikes in food bolied down to a largely biological one. The airborne molecules that our olfactory plates find "matches" for and we can detect vary among people. This affects how we perceive and taste foods.
There is also the 'what I ate as a kid' thing, too.

Example: among other things melons have polyalcohols, and some complex aromatic oils.
These contribute a lot to our smelling these foods. Depending on which combinations of these compounds you perceive, you might hate or love cantelope, be blah about watermelon, or throwup at the sight of cucumbers.

A lot smells we perceive as bad are acids - butyric acid is "bad foot smell", some are ammonia-related bases like the bacterial catlysis products of trietylamine in fish - rotten fish odor, some are thiols or sulfides. We can detect these in minute amount - hydrogen sulfide in 1 part per billion for example. Rancid butter is rancid in a large part because of the presence butryric acid.
[/sortof science]

Anyway, if for example, you could not perceive butyric acid, you could easily eat butter that was going bad. I've eaten going-bad butter. It was okay, but kinda piquant.

Anyhow - I can smell virtually nothing. If you pulverize an ounce of rosemary or garlic I can smell it. Sorta. I can also sorta smell smoke - which is good.

Guess what? Nobody in our family uses me as the taste test guinea pig. I eat things by accident that make other people puke. And they do not faze me at all. I've learned not to eat green fuzzy things from the fridge. Dried out pizza is pretty good, chewy though.
Dry-ish bacon is okay if you fry it first. Dry crumbly sour cream, with the blue fuzz removed is also good. Kinda piquant, too.

I don't really like salty foods, but I eat them just fine.

The flip side of this is I do not seem to get dyspepsia or problems in the posterior end of the alimentary canal either. I can clean up vomit or decaying animal carcasses or pet droopings with zero problems. You do not want me as your personal chef, however. :smile:

Have you always been this way? Is it genetic, or aging, or a chemical exposure?

I've had some nasty run-ins with solvents that have muted my sense of smell temporarily, but I know chemists who have obliterated their sense of smell permanently with lab mishaps.
 

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