What is induction exactly?

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In summary, induction is a law of physics that describes the behavior of objects that are subjected to a changing magnetic field.
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I need to what is induction as it is so confusing. Thanks for the help.
 
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Angel_1 said:
I need to what is induction as it is so confusing. Thanks for the help.
What is it about induction that you struggle with? Also, do you mean electromagnetic induction, where a varying magnetic field generate a potential difference in a conductor or electrostatic induction as in the operation of a Van der Graaf generator?
 
  • #3
electromagnetism
 
  • #5
Or might you mean induction in mathematics or logic as opposed to deduction?
 
  • #6
Angel_1 said:
I need to what is induction as it is so confusing. Thanks for the help.

There are plenty of good articles online that explain what induction is. We can't really help you unless you ask some specific questions.

anorlunda said:
Or might you mean induction in mathematics or logic as opposed to deduction?

Electromagnetic induction. It's in post #3.
 
  • #7
The Wikipedia article (at least the one in the English Wikipedia) is very good. Unfortunately there are many sources (even textbooks) which add a lot to the confusion by stating the law in integral form but are not carful enough with the time derivatives. That leads to all kind of confusion. This confusion has a long tradition. It's as old as the discovery of induction by Faraday. The good thing about this confusion is that it lead Einstein to the clue, how to solve the problem how to describe electromagnetism in different inertial frames, which lead to the famous paper "On electrodynamics of moving bodies" (translation mine), i.e., the final formulation of what we call Special Relativity Theory today.

In the Wikipedia the derivation of the integral form of the induction law from the fundamental (local) laws is correct. When you use this complete formula, there shouldn't be any confusion:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faraday's_law_of_induction#Proof_of_Faraday.27s_law
 

1. What is induction and how does it work?

Induction is a scientific method of reasoning that involves making generalizations based on specific observations. It works by first making observations and then using those observations to form a hypothesis or general rule. This hypothesis is then tested through further observations and experiments to determine its validity.

2. What is the difference between induction and deduction?

Induction and deduction are two different methods of reasoning. Induction involves making generalizations based on specific observations, while deduction involves starting with a general rule or hypothesis and using it to make specific predictions. Induction is often used in scientific research to generate hypotheses, while deduction is used to test and confirm or refute hypotheses.

3. How is induction used in science?

Induction is used in science to make generalizations and develop hypotheses based on specific observations. These hypotheses are then tested through further observations and experiments to determine their validity. Induction is an important part of the scientific method and is used in many different fields of science, including biology, physics, and psychology.

4. What are some examples of induction in everyday life?

Induction is used in everyday life in many ways. For example, when we observe that all apples we have eaten are sweet, we may generalize that all apples are sweet. Similarly, when we observe that all swans we have seen are white, we may generalize that all swans are white. However, it is important to note that these generalizations may not always hold true and may need to be tested through further observations and experiments.

5. What are the limitations of induction?

While induction is a useful method of reasoning, it also has its limitations. One limitation is that generalizations made through induction may not always be accurate or applicable to all cases. Additionally, induction relies on the assumption that the future will be similar to the past, which may not always be true. Therefore, it is important to test and validate hypotheses generated through induction before accepting them as true.

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