What is it about George W. Bush

  • #1
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that brings out the liar and the hypocrite in these pseudo-Americans? They're here for the hors d'oeuvres. Then they say they will leave, But they're still here for dessert.

http://www.snopes.com/inboxer/outrage/leave.asp" [Broken]

Are they always this way, or only about issues they deem important.
 
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Answers and Replies

  • #2
EnumaElish
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I am not sure I'd want them to leave. AFAIK, Hollywood movies is a big ticket item on the list of U.S. exports.
 
  • #3
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I am not sure I'd want them to leave. AFAIK, Hollywood movies is a big ticket item on the list of U.S. exports.
It's a money thing?
 
  • #4
Ivan Seeking
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that brings out the liar and the hypocrite in these pseudo-Americans? They're here for the hors d'oeuvres. Then they say they will leave, But they're still here for dessert.

http://www.snopes.com/inboxer/outrage/leave.asp" [Broken]

Are they always this way, or only about issues they deem important.
Many people including me considered Bush's reelection to be the ultimate violation of traditional American values. And no, I have never come close to this level of outrage and such a sense of betrayal, and I'm not aware of celebrities who have either. If this is the kind of country that people want, they can have it! And we tried to leave, but the practical aspects of doing so - friends, family, jobs - are no small challenge. This is likely true for celebrities as well.

I find it interesting that one finds leaving, or at least the genuine desire to leave, to be less American than supporting a civil war. From my pov, leaving is the ultimate form of peaceful protest. But it appears that not everyone supports the right of peaceful protest; at least not support that is free of disdain and malace, which in itself is an example of why we want to leave.

Try reading the Constitution and esp the Bill of Rights. It can quite enlightening.
 
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  • #5
russ_watters
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I find it interesting that one finds leaving, or at least the genuine desire to leave, to be less American than supporting a civil war.
It shouldn't be surprising....
From my pov, leaving is the ultimate form of peaceful protest.
Oh, is that the ideal that America was founded on? I thought it was founded on fighting for your rights. Peaceful protest is a relatively new thing.

Btw, fighting doesn't necessarily mean with guns. "Peaceful protest", on the other hand, is just useless bellyaching. This is a country built on action.
But it appears that not everyone supports the right of peaceful protest.
Au contraire. People are more than welcome to protest by hanging a flag upside-down, carrying a sign, or leaving the country if they wish. But they shouldn't be deluded into thinking that these actions actually matter.
at least not support that is free of disdain and malace, which in itself is an example of why we want to leave.
The reason for the disdain is the impotence/futility of the act. It is useless.
Try reading the Constitution and esp the Bill of Rights. It can quite enlightening.
The Constitution says nothing about the usefullness (or lack thereof) of "peaceful protest". Try reading the Declaration if Independence or Common Sense instead.

Anyway, yeah, jimmy - these actions fit quite well with the ideology they spring from.
 
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  • #6
lisab
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I, too, have been living the last few years incredulous at what I've been seeing. I try to be compassionate, try to understand: OK, people got SCARED on 9/11. Down to their bones, scared. When people are in that state, they don't think -- they're reacting from their reptile brains. So I rationalize that that's why they gave up their freedoms...why they even gave up habeus corpus! It's just so hard for me to understand, so disappointing.

But what I've found helps me to feel better is getting involed. I've never been a "joiner" but I stared working on political campaigns. It's not fun work and I don't enjoy it, but I had to do something. Yelling at my TV just upsets my family life and wasn't making me feel better.

Don't leave. We need all voices, even if right now people don't want to hear dissention. Besides, when I'm working the phones or going door-to-door and I find someone with your POV it makes my night!
 
  • #7
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Many people including me considered Bush's reelection to be the ultimate violation of traditional American values. And no, I have never come close to this level of outrage and such a sense of betrayal, and I'm not aware of celebrities who have either. If this is the kind of country that people want, they can have it! And we tried to leave, but the practical aspects of doing so - friends, family, jobs - are no small challenge. This is likely true for celebrities as well.

I find it interesting that one finds leaving, or at least the genuine desire to leave, to be less American than supporting a civil war. From my pov, leaving is the ultimate form of peaceful protest. But it appears that not everyone supports the right of peaceful protest; at least not support that is free of disdain and malace, which in itself is an example of why we want to leave.

Try reading the Constitution and esp the Bill of Rights. It can quite enlightening.
The issue I raised was not that they are leaving. It is that they are NOT leaving. When they said they were leaving, they knew they had friends, family and jobs. Yet they said it. Was it a lie, or was it just a casual statement, tossed off with no conviction? How can you imagine an act of greater disdain than to say you are leaving. Do they then take umbrage at the disdain that returns? Disdain? They have no idea what my ancestors lived through in Europe. It was a deadly disdain. And they quail at thought that after they leave, some people won't think well of them? What wusses. Why won't they stand behind their own words? This isn't non-violent protest, it's non-something, but it isn't protest. It's dishonest, disrespectful, and disambulatory.

What does the Constitution, and esp the Bill of Rights say that impinges on this discussion?
 
  • #8
Evo
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Would anyone care if any of those "celebrities" left? Alec Baldwin? Would it matter if he moved to another planet? I say we make them move. :devil: I think so called "celebrities" think way too highly of themselves.

Funny, being a dual national, I could easily move to France, most of my family lives there anyway. I'll gladly stay in the US. My mother sacrificed too much to move to the US so her children wouldn't grow up in France. Not that it's not a lovely place to visit, I just wouldn't want to live there.
 
  • #9
drankin
If we ever lose the right to "bear arms", we won't be much different than many other developed countries. Then I might consider moving on. Somewhere "Down-Under" looks to be nice.
 
  • #10
EnumaElish
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It's a money thing?
There is the issue of who's going to pay for the social security. Short of huge productivity increases or more immigration, my money is on Hollywood.

But from a camaraderie point of view, you can also look at them as exploited workers brainwashed by the very scripts they've been enacting (or directing). Some are even unionized. (Reagan was, wasn't he?)
 
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  • #11
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If we ever lose the right to "bear arms", we won't be much different than many other developed countries. Then I might consider moving on. Somewhere "Down-Under" looks to be nice.

Well my rockets are a lot bigger than your guns, but aren't designed to harm anyone-au contraire, which may be the sole reason besides family keeping me here. I don't know that I would find matters better anywhere, but to participate in a competely hypocritical and sham democracy which incarcerates people at the highest rate anywhere and hasn't a nickel for health care--to me it sends out th wrong message.
 
  • #12
mheslep
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and hasn't a nickel for health care--to me it sends out th wrong message.
Correct, not a nickel:
Medicare: $440B (2007)
Medicaid: $295B (2004)
Veterans care (TriCare), Prescription Drug Benefit, etc, etc.
 
  • #13
mheslep
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Well Alec was going to leave but he realized the value of his family ties and stuck around to shttp://www.aolcdn.com/tmz_audio/0419_baldwin.mp3" [Broken]
 
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  • #14
918
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Correct, not a nickel:
Medicare: $440B (2007)
Medicaid: $295B (2004)
Veterans care (TriCare), Prescription Drug Benefit, etc, etc.
Another beautiful theory slayed by an ugly fact.

Here's a site that shows the number of refugees around the world.
http://www.irr.org.uk/statistics/refugees.html" [Broken]
There are many sites that provide the same kind of information and I have no way of determining which is 'best', but this one looks OK. They found 8.4 million liars and hypocrites at the end of 2005 were more willing than than our own to leave their friends, family, and jobs to seek a better life. Better life? They're in refugee camps for crying out loud. Compared to these, our native grown self-righteous hypocrites look positively well dressed.
 
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  • #15
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If we ever lose the right to "bear arms", we won't be much different than many other developed countries. Then I might consider moving on. Somewhere "Down-Under" looks to be nice.
I've said it before and I'll say it again:

What's the point of taking away our guns if we won't use them when we DO have them?

Currently our rights are and have been siphoned away. Slowly, but surely. Our money, too. But anybody who tries to do anything about it gets knocked down and called anti-American, etc. So why would they WANT to take our guns away?

This is especially true of the people who think of taking away guns as being the "last straw". So what do they do? Find a way around it. Let you keep your boom stick, and take something else without you even giving a damn about it.
 
  • #16
drankin
I've said it before and I'll say it again:

What's the point of taking away our guns if we won't use them when we DO have them?

Currently our rights are and have been siphoned away. Slowly, but surely. Our money, too. But anybody who tries to do anything about it gets knocked down and called anti-American, etc. So why would they WANT to take our guns away?

This is especially true of the people who think of taking away guns as being the "last straw". So what do they do? Find a way around it. Let you keep your boom stick, and take something else without you even giving a damn about it.
I don't completely follow you. How is it I cannot use my gun?
 
  • #17
It all makes sense! these celebrities threatened the not so bright and celebrity adoring Americans (not a small demographic) with the absence of the blessing of their presence in case of Bush' realection.

Regretfully the bluff was called and these people had to return to make crappy movies and we got a crappy president.

It never hurts to try!
 
  • #18
It shouldn't be surprising.... Oh, is that the ideal that America was founded on? I thought it was founded on fighting for your rights. Peaceful protest is a relatively new thing.
Who's rights are we exactly fighting for?

The only time in the History of the USA that people felt they had to fight for their rights was when some people felt strongly it was their god given right to whip a black man around the cotton fields.
I cannot remember any other occasion?!
 
  • #19
mheslep
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Who's rights are we exactly fighting for?

The only time in the History of the USA that people felt they had to fight for their rights was when some people felt strongly it was their god given right to whip a black man around the cotton fields.
I cannot remember any other occasion?!
Then to help there's a little reminder, next time you are home, out at http://www.abmc.gov/cemeteries/cemeteries/ne.php" [Broken], 6 mi E of Maastricht. 8300 reminders there.
 
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  • #20
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these celebrities threatened the not so bright and celebrity adoring Americans (not a small demographic) with the absence of the blessing of their presence in case of Bush' realection.
Good point. They never had any intention of doing anything, but rather of getting other people to do something. It wouldn't surprise me at all to learn that these creeps didn't even vote.

The only time in the History of the USA that people felt they had to fight for their rights was when some people felt strongly it was their god given right to whip a black man around the cotton fields.
I cannot remember any other occasion?!
Once we fought for the right to drink domestically grown tea.
 
  • #21
Good point. They never had any intention of doing anything, but rather of getting other people to do something. It wouldn't surprise me at all to learn that these creeps didn't even vote.


Once we fought for the right to drink domestically grown tea.
The tea thing was before the USA was formed
 
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  • #22
Then to help there's a little reminder, next time you are home, out at http://www.abmc.gov/cemeteries/cemeteries/ne.php" [Broken], 6 mi E of Maastricht. 8300 reminders there.
Absolutely great sacrifice that created a turning point in history, however this is not my point.



Note that the context was protesting governmental policies and I can only recall one such occasion unless you want to include nut cases like Timothy McVeigh.
 
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  • #23
mheslep
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Who's rights are we exactly fighting for?

The only time in the History of the USA that people felt they had to fight for their rights was when some people felt strongly it was their god given right to whip a black man around the cotton fields.
I cannot remember any other occasion?!
Absolutely great sacrifice that created a turning point in history, however this is not my point.



Note that the context was protesting governmental policies and I can only recall one such occasion unless you want to include nut cases like Timothy McVeigh.
Ok please clarify. You're referring only to internal rebellion? Ok, but certainly that is only a limited case of fighting for one's rights. External powers will certainly take them away if they can: 1812, WWI/II, Cold War, ...
 
  • #24
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I don't completely follow you. How is it I cannot use my gun?
Please reread my post. You missed the entire point.

You CAN use your gun. But will you?

What I am saying is, people who scream about owning guns being their right suddenly don't care when other rights are taken away. So what's the point of taking away guns if people will not use them anyway?
 
  • #25
russ_watters
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Who's rights are we exactly fighting for?

The only time in the History of the USA that people felt they had to fight for their rights was when some people felt strongly it was their god given right to whip a black man around the cotton fields.
I cannot remember any other occasion?!
I don't know what you are talking about. Human rights are pretty clear-cut. The fact that some racists kill people they don't like doesn't have anything to do with anything. That's not a right regardless of what they think.
 

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