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What is the amplitude of -sin(x/5 - p)

  1. Aug 20, 2008 #1
    if f(x) = - sin(x/5 - p) are given, then the amplitude must be -1, correct??
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 20, 2008 #2


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    Staff: Mentor

    Re: Amplitude

    Thread moved to homework help. Please take care to post homework and coursework type questions in the Homework Help forum section of the PF, and not in the general technical forums.

    In answer to your question, yes, the amplitude coefficient in front of the sin function is A=-1.

    (EDIT -- See farther down the thread where the magnitude of "amplitude" is discussed... my answer here is wrong)
    Last edited: Aug 21, 2008
  4. Aug 20, 2008 #3
    Re: Amplitude

    But the quiz system marked me incorrect?? why??
  5. Aug 20, 2008 #4
    Re: Amplitude

    yes, solve it, the amplitude is -1, but got the symbol ||, so it turns positive.
  6. Aug 21, 2008 #5


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    Staff Emeritus
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    Re: Amplitude

    You were marked wrong because "amplitude" is always positive: here it is 1, not -1.
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