What Is the Box's Speed at t = 0.6?

In summary, the conversation discusses finding the speed of a 6 kg box sliding down a frictionless incline at an angle of 34 degrees and starting at a height of 17 m above the ground. The suggested method is to resolve the force of gravity into components and use the formula vparallel(t) = v0 + aparallel*t at t = 0.6 seconds with v0 = 0. However, this method may not have been successful for the person asking the question.
  • #1
the_d
127
0
A 6 kg box slides down a long, frictionless
incline of angle 34 degrees. It starts from rest at time
t = 0 at the top of the incline at a height 17 m
above the ground. The acceleration of gravity is 9.81 m/s^2 :Find the box's speed at t = 0.6.

to do this problem i used the conservation of mechanical energy formula and just solved for v #2 squared but apparently that wasnt right
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
the_d said:
A 6 kg box slides down a long, frictionless
incline of angle 34 degrees. It starts from rest at time
t = 0 at the top of the incline at a height 17 m
above the ground. The acceleration of gravity is 9.81 m/s^2 :Find the box's speed at t = 0.6.

to do this problem i used the conservation of mechanical energy formula and just solved for v #2 squared but apparently that wasnt right
You can't directly use Conservation of Energy with the (17 meter) incline height because the box has NOT slid down to the bottom in (t = 0.6 sec). Instead, try resolving the force of gravity into components parallel and perpendicular to the slide, determine the box's acceleration "aparallel" parallel to the incline, and then use the formula below at (t = 0.6 sec) with (v0 = 0):
vparallel(t) = v0 + aparallel*t


~~
 
  • #3
thanx xanthym
 

Related to What Is the Box's Speed at t = 0.6?

1. What is the law of conservation of energy?

The law of conservation of energy states that energy cannot be created or destroyed, but can only be transferred or transformed from one form to another. This means that the total amount of energy in a closed system remains constant over time.

2. How does the law of conservation of energy apply to real-world situations?

The law of conservation of energy applies to all physical systems, including everyday situations. For example, when we turn on a light bulb, electrical energy is transformed into light and heat energy. The total amount of energy in the system remains the same, but it has been converted into different forms.

3. What are some examples of energy conservation in action?

There are many examples of energy conservation in action, such as using renewable energy sources like solar or wind power, using energy-efficient appliances and vehicles, and practicing energy-saving habits like turning off lights when not in use. These actions help reduce the amount of energy we use and therefore conserve it.

4. How is the law of conservation of energy related to the concept of efficiency?

The law of conservation of energy and efficiency are closely related. Efficiency is a measure of how well a system converts one form of energy into another. The more efficient a system is, the less energy is wasted and the closer it adheres to the law of conservation of energy.

5. Are there any exceptions to the law of conservation of energy?

There are no known exceptions to the law of conservation of energy. It has been extensively tested and proven to hold true in all physical systems. However, in quantum mechanics, energy can appear to be created or destroyed due to uncertainty principles, but the total energy in the system still remains constant.

Similar threads

  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
5
Views
935
Replies
10
Views
712
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
2
Replies
55
Views
3K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
6
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
9
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
326
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
9
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
495
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
7
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
721
Back
Top