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What is the difference between mass and weight?

  1. Dec 10, 2015 #1
    If I have a human specimen with a WEIGHT of: 61.14 kg, and then divide by 9.8 m/s^2 (g), then the specimen has a MASS of: 6.24 kg.

    So...is this wrong, or right?

    Is there one type of kg for weight, and another for mass?

    As I understand it: weight is a measure of force, whereas mass is a measure of matter.

    So...is this wrong, or right?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 10, 2015 #2

    Dale

    Staff: Mentor

    There is the mass and the force. Mass is measured in kilograms and force is measured in newtons and the relationship is ##F_g=mg##. If a reading is given in kg then it has already internally done the division by g for you.
     
  4. Dec 10, 2015 #3
    What is the difference between mass and weight?
     
  5. Dec 10, 2015 #4
    Never mind: I just figured it out. Weight is a species of force.
     
  6. Dec 10, 2015 #5

    Dale

    Staff: Mentor

    Yes, sorry I wasn't clear. That is why I labeled it ##F_g## above.
     
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