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What is the fastest way to remove all water content from steam?

  1. Apr 30, 2012 #1
    I have a tank of water of boiling water and a small tube at the top. The output is to turn a turbine or generator, but I want to remove the water soon after it leaves the tank. That way I won't need to bother with condensation/water return later. What is the fastest way to remove the water content of the steam with minimal reduction of the air velocity?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 30, 2012 #2

    russ_watters

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    I'm a little confused, but will take a shot: there is no air, only steam so you can't remove it from itself.

    If you meant something different, please rephrase...
     
  4. Apr 30, 2012 #3
    as you cool down the steam, it will condensate on the sides of the tubing; there will still be pressure on the end of the capillary tubing, though. Something has to cause the pressure, doesn't it?
     
  5. Apr 30, 2012 #4

    russ_watters

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    [edit] Ok, I misread since you're mixing some terms together -- there is no air here, just steam...

    You're saying that as steam leaves the tank, some will condense to water before gettting to the turbine. Certainly. There's two ways to remove it: Sloping and steam traps. Slope the pipe back to the tank and the water will run back on its own. If that's not feasbile, you'll need traps at the low points.

    But lets back up: since you're a novice at steam power production, what are you using for a vessel and how much are you pressurizing it? This is potentially extremely dangerous and we need to deal with that issue if we are going to help you with the project.
     
  6. Apr 30, 2012 #5
    I want the steam to pass over a squirrel cage and turn a generator. The squirrel cage will have the water resistance of the water collecting on it (over time) unless I do something about that and I also have to design a water return afterwards. The easiest way to have dry air passing over the wheel.
     
  7. Apr 30, 2012 #6

    russ_watters

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    Sorry, I edited my post late after rereading yours...so please reread mine. But also, it would be helpful if you stop using the word "air"...
     
  8. Apr 30, 2012 #7
    ok. no air. The heat will be provided by a wood-burning fire-box and the vessel will be a cast-iron bbq pit. relief valve to keep it under 80psi. sloping is the preferred design. trying to keep it simple.
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2012
  9. Apr 30, 2012 #8
    what is the difference between superheated air with 100% humidity and steam?

    If you remove the heat from steam in a closed system, what is left- water and a vacuum?
     
  10. Apr 30, 2012 #9

    russ_watters

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    There is no such thing as "superheated air". If a steam system starts with air in it, typically the air is purged to avoid doing useless work moving the air around.

    If the system is open, the steam will drive the air out.
    Water and water vapor in a partial vacuum. You can check a steam table for the exact properties of the mixture.
    I'm sorry, but that's not a legitimate pressure vessel and we can't support dangerous activities here.
     
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