What is the Fourier Cosine Integral Identity for Deriving B* and A(w)?

In summary, the conversation is about showing that xf(x) is equal to the integral from 0 to infinity of [B*(w)sin(wx)]dw, where B* is defined as -dA/dw and A(w) is given by A(w) = 2/pi integral from 0 to infinity [f(v) cos(wv)] dv. The attempt at a solution involves manipulating integrals on both sides, but the individual steps are not clear. The question of how to algebraically manipulate integrals of the form g(x) = integral from 0 to infinity f(x,y)dy is also raised, and there is uncertainty about whether the question should be reposted in the engineering section.
  • #1
madah12
326
1

Homework Statement


show that
xf(x)=integral from 0 to infinity of [B*(w)sin(wx)]dw , // B* is a function not B * w

where B* = -dA/dw
A(w) = 2/pi integral from 0 to infinity [f(v) cos(wv)] dv

Homework Equations

f(x)=integral from 0 to infinity [A(w)cos(wx)] dw

The Attempt at a Solution



working on right hand side
B*= 2/pi * integral from 0 to infinity [vf(v)cos(wv)dv]
=integral from 0 to infinity of [2/pi * integral from 0 to infinity [vf(v)cos(wv)dv]sin(wx)]dw
left side = integral from 0 to infinity [ A(w)xcos(wx)]dw

Even when i tried writing A as integral i don't see how do i prove 2 sides which have 2 integrals in them equal each other?
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
>_> I know I didn't do a lot of work but there is not much to work on from the book and I don't really know how to algebriacly manipulate integrals of the form g(x) = integral from 0 to infinity f(x,y)dy
 
  • #3
should I repost this in engineering section?
 
  • #4
those are pictures of the problem if it's not clear ><

(20)(a2)
 

Attachments

  • problem.jpg
    problem.jpg
    42.4 KB · Views: 389
  • problem 2.jpg
    problem 2.jpg
    37.5 KB · Views: 407
Last edited:

1. What is the Fourier cosine integral?

The Fourier cosine integral is a mathematical tool used in the field of Fourier analysis to decompose a function into its constituent frequencies. It is defined as the integral of a function multiplied by the cosine function, and is used to represent even functions in terms of their cosine components.

2. How is the Fourier cosine integral different from the Fourier sine integral?

The Fourier cosine integral and the Fourier sine integral are similar in that they both decompose a function into its constituent frequencies. However, the main difference is that the Fourier cosine integral is used to represent even functions, while the Fourier sine integral is used for odd functions.

3. What is the relationship between the Fourier cosine integral and the Fourier transform?

The Fourier cosine integral is a special case of the Fourier transform. It is specifically used for functions that are even and periodic, while the Fourier transform can be used for any function. The Fourier cosine integral can be derived from the Fourier transform by setting the imaginary part of the Fourier transform to zero.

4. How is the Fourier cosine integral used in signal processing?

The Fourier cosine integral is used in signal processing to analyze and manipulate signals. By decomposing a signal into its constituent frequencies, engineers and scientists can better understand and optimize the signal for various applications, such as filtering, noise reduction, and compression.

5. Can the Fourier cosine integral be extended to higher dimensions?

Yes, the Fourier cosine integral can be extended to higher dimensions, such as two or three dimensions. This allows for the analysis of functions and signals in multiple dimensions, which is useful in fields such as image processing and computer vision.

Similar threads

  • Calculus and Beyond Homework Help
Replies
18
Views
1K
  • Calculus and Beyond Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
277
  • Calculus and Beyond Homework Help
Replies
5
Views
338
  • Calculus and Beyond Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
2K
  • Calculus and Beyond Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
657
  • Calculus and Beyond Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
337
  • Calculus and Beyond Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
270
  • Calculus and Beyond Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
984
  • Calculus and Beyond Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
2K
  • Calculus and Beyond Homework Help
Replies
8
Views
2K
Back
Top