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What is the most respectable career?

  1. Nov 27, 2007 #1
    In the entire world, what type of profession is most respectable? I know this is based on your opinions. I just want to hear them.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 27, 2007 #2

    stewartcs

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    The first thing that pops into my head is a solider. Of course this is based on my definition of respectable. One that is willing to sacrifice their life for others is respectable in my book.
     
  4. Nov 27, 2007 #3

    Chris Hillman

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    Shshsh! Don't let Mr. Incredible Hear You Say This!

    A "solider"? You mean Elastigirl isn't respectable?!
     
  5. Nov 27, 2007 #4

    ShawnD

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    Engineering is way up there, mostly because the term itself means literally nothing to most people. "you're an engineer? cool, so you, like, build rocket sleds?" Sure baby, whatever you want. :cool:
     
  6. Nov 27, 2007 #5
    Global Emperor. Imagine the babes you could get :uhh:
     
  7. Nov 27, 2007 #6

    ShawnD

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    Fixed :wink:
     
  8. Nov 27, 2007 #7

    ~christina~

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    rofl :rofl:
     
  9. Nov 27, 2007 #8

    Evo

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    I'm wondering if the OP is confusing respectable with respected?

    A janitor is a respectable job, but it's not highly respected.
     
  10. Nov 27, 2007 #9

    turbo

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    Musician is 'way cool. No matter what I did in my week-day jobs, I always enjoyed the weekend gigs in local bars and taverns. You may not think that playing blues and rock in bars is respectable, but when you're getting well-paid, pretty young ladies flirt and buy you drinks, and one of your biggest fans is the national enforcer for a major motorcycle club (you've heard of them), that's a comfort zone that is hard to beat. Sure, there's the little obstacles of talent and soul if you're lacking, but you asked.

    For respectable, stay away from investment councilor, clergyman, lawyer, used-car (or even new-car) salesman, loan officer, telemarketer, etc. If you're fantastically wealthy, a career as a philanthropist is a respectable endeavor.:rolleyes:
     
  11. Nov 27, 2007 #10

    DaveC426913

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    Well, lately, I would say that the most respectable and respected job far and away is firefighter.

    Usually it is individuals who are lauded for their actions. In the case of firefighters, the title "hero" virtually comes with the hat.
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2007
  12. Nov 27, 2007 #11

    turbo

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    Yes. That is a physically demanding profession that involves a degree of personal risk that most of us would not want to accept in some situations. There was a big fire in an abandoned factory in Worcester MA a number of years ago. I know a member of the response team that is still not doing well (PTSD), and his dog (a sweet pit-bull/boxer cross) and his friends are all that seem to keep him going day-to-day.
     
  13. Nov 27, 2007 #12

    Kurdt

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    I've always wondered why firefighters were so respected. For the most part they sit around doing nothing. If they're respected because most people wouldn't go into a burning building to save someone then I'm disappointed.
     
  14. Nov 27, 2007 #13

    stewartcs

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    Disappointed that others won't risk their lives to save someone else or disappointed that they are respected for it?
     
  15. Nov 27, 2007 #14

    Evo

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    A lot of firefighters are drawn to the danger and the fire by their personalities, if you listen to reasons why they become firefighters, it's not all that savory in a lot of cases. Although I can't find fault with someone that uses such quirks for good.
     
  16. Nov 27, 2007 #15

    Kurdt

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    Disappointed that others would seemingly find watching people suffer while they did nothing the natural choice.
     
  17. Nov 27, 2007 #16

    Evo

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    I think some things like fire tend to paralyze people with fear. It's one of the first things you are taught to fear as a child.
     
  18. Nov 27, 2007 #17

    turbo

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    I know a lot of firefighters. Here in Maine, the population density is not high enough to support large fire departments, but great numbers of people may be required to save lives and property on very short notice in the event of a fire, especially with the great number of old wood-frame houses with wood stoves and old chimneys. In our situation, most firefighters are volunteers, and every loss of a firefighter is deeply felt. They are friends, family, or acquaintances. When you live in a town of less than a few thousand people (most here are MUCH smaller), there is no way to lose a firefighter that does not affect the whole town.
     
  19. Nov 27, 2007 #18

    Ivan Seeking

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    I couldn't name just one.

    I put medical people right up there...esp people who work in the ER. Tsu could tell you stories for hours that would have many here in tears in minutes. It takes a very special person to do that sort of work and really care about the patients, and not commit suicide.
     
  20. Nov 27, 2007 #19

    Astronuc

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    That's interesting because my parents never taught me to fear anything. I learned to manage fire at an early age, and I'd split wood with an axe by the time I was 6. My grandparents cooked with a wood fired stove into the mid-60's. My dad and I would burn scrap wood, twigs and branches and some household waster, so I learned to make and control fire.

    We were taught to be cautious or careful, but I was never taught to fear anything.
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2007
  21. Nov 27, 2007 #20

    turbo

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    Like you, I was never taught to fear anything, but to respect things that could get out of hand. As a kid, I worked around my uncle's Herefords, and they were mostly pretty chummy (although huge!) and I split firewood, collected tinder and twigs, and learned how to control open fires and contained (stove) fires. I also learned how to kill, and process livestock and how to butcher it after. I don't know how many people younger than 50 or so have the skills that could keep them alive with no electricity and no gasoline - the people with their fingers on these commodities have the power to destroy much of our country.
     
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