1. Limited time only! Sign up for a free 30min personal tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

What is the tension in the rope problem?

  1. Jul 20, 2009 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    Buckets and a Pulley Two buckets of sand hang from opposite ends of a rope that passes over an ideal pulley. One bucket is full and weighs 130 N; the other bucket is only partly filled and weighs 65 N.
    a) Initially, you hold onto the lighter bucket to keep it from moving. What is the tension in the rope?
    b) You release the lighter bucket and the heavier one descends. What is the tension in the rope now?
    c) Eventually the heavier bucket lands and the two buckets come to rest. What is the tension in the rope now?


    2. Relevant equations



    3. The attempt at a solution
    a) Initially, you hold onto the lighter bucket to keep it from moving. What is the tension in the rope?
    Tension is equal of the weight of the first bucket
    T= 130N

    b) You release the lighter bucket and the heavier one descends. What is the tension in the rope now?
    Tension is equal of the weight difference between the of the first and secong buckets.
    T= 130 - 65= 65N (But this answer is wrong. Could someone please explain?)

    c) Eventually the heavier bucket lands and the two buckets come to rest. What is the tension in the rope now?
    Tension is equal of the weight of the second bucket
    T= 65N
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 20, 2009 #2

    djeitnstine

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Re: Tension

    for b) have you drawn a free body diagram of the buckets in flight?
     
  4. Jul 20, 2009 #3
    Re: Tension

    Yes, I did draw a free body diagram. In second situation since the heavier one descends (due to force of gravity) and the lighter one moves upwards I subtracted 65N from 130N.

    Am I in right track? If not could you please explain...?

    Thanks in advance
     
  5. Jul 20, 2009 #4
    Re: Tension

    Unfortunately this question isn't that simple. Having drawn your free body diagrams, use Newton's 2nd Law on each bucket. What can you say about the acceleration of each bucket? Can you then solve for the tension?
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: What is the tension in the rope problem?
Loading...