What physics area should I choose?

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My university offers some courses in different areas, such as

- Particle Physics (I, II)

- Nuclear Physics (I, II)

- Astrophysics (I)

-Modern Atrophysics (I,II)

- Computational Physics (I, II)

- SR/GR

- Nonlinear Dynamical Sys and Chaos (I, II)

- QM II

So I am allowed to take 6 courses from these topics, I am not sure which ones should I pick. I want to do my masters abroad (Canada or in some European country).
In general, I want to stay in school and do my masters but for example, if I wanted to another job like working for the government or in a private company, then which one should I pursue?
 

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  • #2
Dr. Courtney
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QMII is essential if you are headed to grad school.

Computational Physics (I,II) will give you both some marketable skills as well as likely being useful in grad school.

Odds are Nonlinear Dynamical Sys and Chaos (I, II) will also provide marketable skills and may be useful in grad school.
 
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QMII is essential if you are headed to grad school.

Computational Physics (I,II) will give you both some marketable skills as well as likely being useful in grad school.

Odds are Nonlinear Dynamical Sys and Chaos (I, II) will also provide marketable skills and may be useful in grad school.
I see, well thanks for your reply. Most poeple prefer Computational Physics. What is Chaos used for ?
 
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Dr. Courtney
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I see, well thanks for your reply. Most poeple prefer Computational Physics. What is Chaos used for ?
It's more the training in seeing how to understand the dynamics of disordered systems of differential equations, combined with the computational skills to see what they are doing in the first place. If these courses are good, you'll develop lots of skills solving and understanding differential equations for disorderly systems. "Chaos" is not so much the point, but rather the training you'll pick up to understand the chaos.
 
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I see your point. So particle physics or astrophysics are dead topics I guess or they are too much theoritical ? So that if I cant get a job in uni i ll be wasted my years..
 
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StoneTemplePython
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Dr. Courtney
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I see your point. So particle physics or astrophysics are dead topics I guess or they are too much theoritical ? So that if I cant get a job in uni i ll be wasted my years..
Not dead by any means. Just less likely to be as useful downstream given your goals and intent.
 
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I want to ask a question. I decided to focus on astrophysics mainly on cosmology... and comp physics. In this case I should defintly take SR and GR classes right ?
 
  • #9
DEvens
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I want to ask a question. I decided to focus on astrophysics mainly on cosmology... and comp physics. In this case I should defintly take SR and GR classes right ?
You should study SR regardless of what kind of physics you are going to do. You should have studied it in first year undergrad.

Astrophysics and cosmology are stuffed tight with application of GR. If you are doing those subjects you should be doing all the GR you can force into your brain. Maybe you don't need to carry a copy of "Gravitation" around with you wherever you go. But you should certainly get a copy of _Gravitation and Cosmology_ by Weinberg.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/8126517557/?tag=pfamazon01-20&tag=pfamazon01-20
 
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  • #10
DEvens
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As to the "what should I study" question. You should try to find the topic that holds your attention. The thing that, when it is in your field of view it draws you to go look. The thing that when you work on it, hours pass and you have not noticed, don't need to be pushed to work on, and need to be called to stop working on and go have dinner etc.

If you can find a topic that grabs you this way, you won't need to be driven. You will naturally just go and work on it all the time. And progress will feel *good*.

Don't be primarily concerned with what is marketable. You will pick up marketable in almost any area of physics. You will learn how to understand and solve problems. That's marketable. It's cool if you pick up extra skills. It never hurts to know a computer language, for example. It never hurts to learn how to do any related skill. Lab classes if you are interested and capable that way. Any related subject that will support your "subject that holds you" is likely to also be marketable.

But if you can be passionate about something, then your work will be keen and interesting and fun.
 
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Thanks I agree with you. I guess cosmology has been my interest over 4 years. We learned little SR in the modern physics course but This semester I ll take a course only related to the SR and then next semester about GR.
Gravitation and Cosmology_ by Weinberg
Thats is a real classic :) Thanks for the advice
 

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