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Stargazing What sort of camera would you use?

  1. Jan 18, 2017 #1
    Hi. I am doing a project concerning getting a picture of the milky way, in a similar manner of the artists impressions artwork( I don't actually intend to try it obviously). As I don't have a clue what camera to use as an example becuase I need the FOV to work out how far it needs to travel perpendicular to the centre of the galaxy to get a complete picture.

    What existing camera (if any) would work best on the probe? Was thinking of using the ones from New Horizons then I realised that's for planetary imaging so probably wouldn't work well.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 18, 2017 #2

    russ_watters

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    This is a tough question to answer because while the camera doesn't necessarily have to be very specialized (a normal SLR type with a wide angle lens, adapted for installation on the probe might work), the mission itself is way, way beyond our capabilities. How wide of a fov you need is going to depend on how far away from the galactic plane you get.
     
  4. Jan 18, 2017 #3
    That's what my project was about. I am going to work out the distance required to get a picture, then go through all the space drives that have been theorised,provide detail(time to travel,cost,time required until technology exists and how it works), determine which one is the best option and work out how far away we are technologically and try and determine a time frame,estimate cost and maybe come up with a few ways to lower price or speed up travel.i also want to write about what humanity needs to achieve before its possible.It seems like it will be fun.
    So I could put use any distance and work from that, say 15 kpc? Or would 30 be better?
     
  5. Jan 18, 2017 #4

    russ_watters

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    Then you will just need to arbitrarily pick your field of view. You can literally go as wide as you want and flatten it with software, but you will have to decide for yourself how much perspective distortion and and shading is acceptable (because the galaxy is not perfectly flat/thin).
     
  6. Jan 20, 2017 #5

    Chronos

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    The IR sensitivity of CMOS chips is an issue for AP. That is why IR mods are widely advertised for SLR's.
     
  7. Jan 20, 2017 #6

    davenn

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    I am still seriously struggling to understand what all that almost meaningless word jargon has to do with a camera for taking a photo of the milky way ??


    Dave
     
  8. Jan 20, 2017 #7

    davenn

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    the milky way on my 14mm ultra wide angle lens on a full frame DSLR camera

    upload_2017-1-21_0-12-29.png

    Dave
     
  9. Jan 20, 2017 #8

    russ_watters

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    Yeah, that's why I said "adapted". Astro cams may use the same chips as DSLRS, but they aren't the same physical camera.
     
  10. Jan 20, 2017 #9

    russ_watters

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    That photo was taken from Earth. The OP wants to take a photo from above the plane of the galaxy so he can see the whole thing.
     
  11. Jan 20, 2017 #10

    davenn

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    well that isn't going to happen for our galaxy huh :wink::wink:

    refer to my earlier post #6

    the best that that could be visualised would be say a pic of the Andromeda galaxy
     
  12. Jan 20, 2017 #11

    russ_watters

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    It can happen in a thought experiment.
     
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