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What to read to learn Electrical Engineering

  1. Dec 1, 2015 #1
    Is there any standard book or source to go to for someone wanting to learn how electricity works and motors and AC and DC so they can pursue their ideas and be able to understand the theory of their electrical imaginations and how it could or could not work?

    I"m not wanting a career in anything electrical at all, I have my own career and family, and just want to be able to tinker around with ideas and make my own DIY-electrical generators, wind, solar, and other powered stuff.

    But I find myself lost in a lot of it to start with. I have time on my hands but haven't found anything that didn't feel like at-home-college-courses :/
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 1, 2015 #2
    I haven't read it, but I have always seen The Art of Electronics as many people's #1 recommendation.
     
  4. Dec 1, 2015 #3
    thank you, I"ll look into it
     
  5. Dec 2, 2015 #4

    meBigGuy

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    Gold Member

    There are numerous online electronics and electricity courses and tutorials for everything imaginable. Most questions will bring up a youtube video.

    https://www.khanacademy.org/science/physics/circuits-topic/circuits-resistance/v/circuits-part-1 <--- best online
    http://www.electronicstheory.com/

    You can start clicking through hyperphysics here
    http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/electric/dccircon.html#c1 <--- survey the field

    And, of course, the dreaded online college courses:
    http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/electrical-engineering-and-computer-science/


    Everybody seems to recommend the Art of Electronics. Some say it is more of an unorganized reference/cookbook than a textbook.
    You should go to a local bookstore and browse the books for one that seems to be suited to you.

    The first electronics book I ever read was Elements of Radio, which started out explaining how radios work. Much more fun to start with than Ohms Law.
    Buy an old banged up copy.
     
  6. Dec 2, 2015 #5
    thank you! this should keep me interested for a while, when I invent my idea and become a millionaire I'll pm you :)
     
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