What velocity does the particle need to get to point B?

In summary, the conversation discusses solving a physics problem involving acceleration and distance. The approach involves dividing the problem into two parts and using appropriate formulas for each part. The conversation also touches on the importance of using correct units in calculations.
  • #1
ClearWhey
19
4
Homework Statement
A particle is at point A in a certain moment. The particle rolls with an angle of inclination a. It’s velocity direction is parallel to the upper edge. What velocity V0 does it need to reach into the hole B?

Sorry for my english
Relevant Equations
Look at the picture to get a better idea of the problem.
It was a long time ago I did these kind of problems so I’m a bit rusty. The only thing I can think of is divide it up to two parts one x and one y.

In y the acceleration is sin(a)*9.82? Then put that in the equation and solve for t.

In x the there is no acceleration so the formula is x=V0*t, I put in t from y and solve for V0?

Haven’t gotten the answer paper yet so I have no idea if I’m on the right path or wrong. That is why I’m asking here if I’m solving this question right, if not how should I do it?

Thanks in advance for the help!
71EDAA2E-1DA0-4245-9624-950298303FA5.jpeg
 
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  • #2
Looks like the right approach.
 
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  • #3
You have given the inclination angle as ##a## and according to the figure the "horizontal" distance between A and B also labelled as ##a##. This might lead to confusing algebra.

Perhaps you meant to use ##\alpha## as the angle?
 
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  • #4
gneill said:
You have given the inclination angle as ##a## and according to the figure the "horizontal" distance between A and B also labelled as ##a##. This might lead to confusing algebra.

Perhaps you meant to use ##\alpha## as the angle?

Yes you are correct.

haruspex said:
Looks like the right approach.

What do you think about my solution?
4382B696-6109-4DF2-B5B3-BEE9211F2C16.jpeg
 
  • #5
ClearWhey said:
What do you think about my solution?
That is right, but there is no point in substituting a numerical value for g when you don't have numbers for the rest of the variables. Just leave it as g.
And if you do substitute a numerical value you must include the units: ##v_0=a\sqrt{\frac{9.82\sin(\alpha)ms^{-2}}{2b}}##
 
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  • #6
haruspex said:
That is right, but there is no point in substituting a numerical value for g when you don't have numbers for the rest of the variables. Just leave it as g.
And if you do substitute a numerical value you must include the units: ##v_0=a\sqrt{\frac{9.82\sin(\alpha)ms^{-2}}{2b}}##

Alright will keep that in mind for the future and thanks for the help!
 
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Related to What velocity does the particle need to get to point B?

1. What is the definition of velocity?

Velocity is a measure of how fast an object is moving in a specific direction. It is a vector quantity, meaning it has both magnitude (speed) and direction.

2. How is velocity calculated?

Velocity is calculated by dividing the change in an object's position by the change in time. It is expressed in units of distance per time, such as meters per second or miles per hour.

3. Can velocity be negative?

Yes, velocity can be negative if the object is moving in the opposite direction of the chosen reference point. For example, if a car is moving west but the reference point is east, the velocity would be negative.

4. What is the difference between velocity and speed?

Velocity and speed are often used interchangeably, but they are actually different concepts. Speed is a measure of how fast an object is moving, while velocity includes both speed and direction.

5. How does velocity affect an object's motion?

The velocity of an object affects its motion by determining its speed and direction. An object with a higher velocity will cover more distance in a shorter amount of time than an object with a lower velocity. Changes in velocity also result in changes in an object's acceleration.

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