What was your favorite book ever, and why?

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turbo

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Like the title says...
 
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Does the bible count as a book? I can't believe they give this book to children :) well I enjoyed it.
 
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bible translates as book in old greek I think.

I read the dictionary when I was young, --took a while---I think I got the most out of it
 
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TubbaBlubba

bible translates as book in old greek I think.

I read the dictionary when I was young, --took a while---I think I got the most out of it
"Books", even, I think.


My most prized book would've had to be that old English - Swedish dictionary I always used as a kid. God knows how many video games that saved me in, and how many words I learned from that. Probably more than all the words I learned from English homework combined.
 
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I think Sartre's Nausea is the best because of it's deep and esoteric writing style rather than the content which is kind of weird.
 
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I probably should plug this other great book...

The Great Divorce by C.S. Lewis

It's got a magical bus with tons of old dead people.
 

DaveC426913

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"Books", even, I think.
Phoenician, it looks like:

"EtymologyLatin biblia (“‘a collection of books’”) (since there are many books in the Bible) < Ancient Greek βιβλία (biblia), “‘books’”), plural of βιβλίον (biblion), “‘small book’”), originally a diminutive of βίβλος (biblos), “‘book’”) < βύβλος (bublos), “‘papyrus’”) (from the ancient Phoenician city of Byblos which exported this writing material)."




http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/bible
 

Math Is Hard

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I'm going to go with "https://www.amazon.com/dp/0497503093/?tag=pfamazon01-20" by Philip M. Parker.

Previously I had only considered the Indian stacking chair market from the bar, bowling center, cafeteria, library, restaurant, and school sectors. It took Parker's targeted insight to give me a fresh perspective. But don't take my word for it. Read the reviews on Amazon.
 
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lisab

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It's $495 :surprised!
It seems to contain very valuable information.

One of the reviews:
This is, hands down, the best book I have read on this topic - and I have read plenty. I would however, in future editions, like to see the topic of chair stacking in bowling alleys better addressed. Nice work by the author!
:rofl:
 
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Dr. Parker has written a masterpiece!
I first discovered Dr. Parker's brilliant analysis and forecast of Indian stacking chair consumption while completing my thesis on the roll played by wheel based ergonomic office chairs in workplace fatalities. In particular, I found fascinating the statistical modeling employed by Dr. Parker to determine governmental stacking chair purchase requirements for the year...

This book is, indeed, quite good at describing the outlook for public building stacking chairs excluding bar, bowling center, library, restaurant, and school stacking chairs in India. However, I am a bit offended that the information for the Kashmir region (which is claimed by both India and Pakistan) seems incomplete. Such scholarship is inexcusable. I will be going...

LoL...
 

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baywax

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I was fascinated at an early age with the old books in the reserved section of the UBC library, where my mom was the ever present tyrant to the profs...

One I actually was allowed to keep was "Pilgrims Progress". It was from the 1700s or so. Very cool to have and read.
 

TubbaBlubba

I really need to start reading more regular novels... I got a bit stuck when I had to read Oliver Twist for my English course... When I have to read something for school, no matter how good it is, it's as if something in my head stops.

The only book I currently and actively employ is my New Nelson Kanji dictionary. Very useful in some situations.
 
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bible translates as book in old greek I think.

I read the dictionary when I was young, --took a while---I think I got the most out of it
You can't trust those bargain basement dictionaries.
 
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catch 22
because of its satire, i guess
 
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One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
by Ken Kesey
 

turbo

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I think mine is Dune, because I have read it so many times, and always find something new in it.
 
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I think mine is Dune, because I have read it so many times, and always find something new in it.
I think it's mine too. I simply love it.
 

BobG

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I'm going to go with "https://www.amazon.com/dp/0497503093/?tag=pfamazon01-20" by Philip M. Parker.

Previously I had only considered the Indian stacking chair market from the bar, bowling center, cafeteria, library, restaurant, and school sectors. It took Parker's targeted insight to give me a fresh perspective. But don't take my word for it. Read the reviews on Amazon.
This is my favorite book, too. It's very hot! Interesting trivia: This is the book Annie Savoy read to Nuke LaLouche in Bull Durham.

I love the reviews:

I first discovered Dr. Parker's brilliant analysis and forecast of Indian stacking chair consumption while completing my thesis on the roll played by wheel based ergonomic office chairs in workplace fatalities. In particular, I found fascinating the statistical modeling employed by Dr. Parker to determine governmental stacking chair purchase requirements for the year 2011, which is well know to be the year that the Indian Civil Service Entrance Exam switches to a "Standing Only" testing methodology. Indeed, after months of careful study I can find only two obvious faults with the findings put forward by Dr. Parker. Firstly, and far more seriously, while Dr. Parker's analysis included over 2600 Indian municipalities, his thoughtless exclusion of Indian bowling allies cuts short any possible insight into the scarcity of stacking chairs and the effects on Hindu-Muslim bowling alley violence. Perhaps the infamy of the religious riots in Pune, following Mohinder Singh's perfect 300 game in 1998 led to this exclusion, I only hope that this obvious gap in analysis does not alienate future generations of readers and lead them to repudiation this otherwise thoughtful and deeply insightful study. My final criticism has to do with the quality of the publication and lack of full color illustrations. The choice to use black and white illustrations may be in keeping with the scholarly focus of this publication but I find it hard to distinguish between the Duo and Cello stacking chairs featured prominently on pages 316-318.
Interestingly, this book has an odd number of pages. What are the odds of that happening?
 
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