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What was your favorite book ever, and why?

  1. May 31, 2010 #1

    turbo

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    Like the title says...
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 31, 2010 #2
    Does the bible count as a book? I can't believe they give this book to children :) well I enjoyed it.
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2010
  4. May 31, 2010 #3
    bible translates as book in old greek I think.

    I read the dictionary when I was young, --took a while---I think I got the most out of it
     
  5. May 31, 2010 #4
    Sure, why not? it's got a front cover, a back cover, and pages in between!
     
  6. May 31, 2010 #5

    DaveC426913

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    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  7. May 31, 2010 #6
    "Books", even, I think.


    My most prized book would've had to be that old English - Swedish dictionary I always used as a kid. God knows how many video games that saved me in, and how many words I learned from that. Probably more than all the words I learned from English homework combined.
     
  8. May 31, 2010 #7
    I think Sartre's Nausea is the best because of it's deep and esoteric writing style rather than the content which is kind of weird.
     
  9. May 31, 2010 #8
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  10. May 31, 2010 #9
    I probably should plug this other great book...

    The Great Divorce by C.S. Lewis

    It's got a magical bus with tons of old dead people.
     
  11. May 31, 2010 #10

    DaveC426913

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    I guess because it nourishes both halves of my Da Vincian mind - the artist and the scientist.
     
  12. May 31, 2010 #11
    Phoenician, it looks like:

    "EtymologyLatin biblia (“‘a collection of books’”) (since there are many books in the Bible) < Ancient Greek βιβλία (biblia), “‘books’”), plural of βιβλίον (biblion), “‘small book’”), originally a diminutive of βίβλος (biblos), “‘book’”) < βύβλος (bublos), “‘papyrus’”) (from the ancient Phoenician city of Byblos which exported this writing material)."




    http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/bible
     
  13. May 31, 2010 #12

    Math Is Hard

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  14. May 31, 2010 #13

    lisab

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    It's $495 :surprised!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  15. May 31, 2010 #14
    It seems to contain very valuable information.

    One of the reviews:
    :rofl:
     
  16. May 31, 2010 #15
    Dr. Parker has written a masterpiece!
    I first discovered Dr. Parker's brilliant analysis and forecast of Indian stacking chair consumption while completing my thesis on the roll played by wheel based ergonomic office chairs in workplace fatalities. In particular, I found fascinating the statistical modeling employed by Dr. Parker to determine governmental stacking chair purchase requirements for the year...

    This book is, indeed, quite good at describing the outlook for public building stacking chairs excluding bar, bowling center, library, restaurant, and school stacking chairs in India. However, I am a bit offended that the information for the Kashmir region (which is claimed by both India and Pakistan) seems incomplete. Such scholarship is inexcusable. I will be going...

    LoL...
     
  17. May 31, 2010 #16

    Math Is Hard

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    Yes, but it's eligible for FREE Super Saver shipping.
     
  18. May 31, 2010 #17

    jtbell

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    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  19. Jun 1, 2010 #18

    baywax

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    I was fascinated at an early age with the old books in the reserved section of the UBC library, where my mom was the ever present tyrant to the profs...

    One I actually was allowed to keep was "Pilgrims Progress". It was from the 1700s or so. Very cool to have and read.
     
  20. Jun 1, 2010 #19
    I really need to start reading more regular novels... I got a bit stuck when I had to read Oliver Twist for my English course... When I have to read something for school, no matter how good it is, it's as if something in my head stops.

    The only book I currently and actively employ is my New Nelson Kanji dictionary. Very useful in some situations.
     
  21. Jun 1, 2010 #20
    You can't trust those bargain basement dictionaries.
     
  22. Jun 1, 2010 #21
    catch 22
    because of its satire, i guess
     
  23. Jun 1, 2010 #22
    One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
    by Ken Kesey
     
  24. Jun 1, 2010 #23

    turbo

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    I think mine is Dune, because I have read it so many times, and always find something new in it.
     
  25. Jun 1, 2010 #24
    I think it's mine too. I simply love it.
     
  26. Jun 1, 2010 #25

    BobG

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    This is my favorite book, too. It's very hot! Interesting trivia: This is the book Annie Savoy read to Nuke LaLouche in Bull Durham.

    I love the reviews:

    Interestingly, this book has an odd number of pages. What are the odds of that happening?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
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