Where can I find resources for learning Relativity as a high school student?

In summary, high school students looking to learn about the components of relativity can start with books such as "Relativity, the Special and the General Theory" by Crown Publishers or "A Traveler's Guide to Spacetime: An Introduction to the Special Theory of Relativity" by Thomas A. Moore. They can also watch lecture series on the topic, such as the one available on YouTube by Stanford University. It is recommended to thoroughly understand the special theory of relativity before moving on to the general theory, and to utilize resources such as spacetime diagrams. Additionally, there are online forums and threads with links to helpful resources, such as the one provided by JesseM on Physics Forums.
  • #1
Anthony24
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0
Okay I am a high school school student trying to learn the components of relativity, but i can't find anything that really explains any of it with examples and actual numbers. Does anyone know of a good place to learn this? I just feel stuck with high school education in the field of physics.
 
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  • #2
You should start with a presentation of SR that emphasizes spacetime diagrams. Lots of people here say that the book by Taylor & Wheeler is the best choice. (I haven't read it myself). You should also do a search for similar threads. JesseM posted a bunch of links to online resources in one of them.
 
  • #3
Spacetime Physics by Taylor and Wheeler is a good book, but another good book, A Traveler's Guide to Spacetime: An Introduction to the Special Theory of Relativity by Thomas A. Moore, might be more appropriate for you.
 
  • #4
Anthony24 said:
Okay I am a high school school student trying to learn the components of relativity, but i can't find anything that really explains any of it with examples and actual numbers. Does anyone know of a good place to learn this? I just feel stuck with high school education in the field of physics.

I'd recommend that you start with Einstein's little book, "Relativity, the Special and the General Theory", by Crown Publishers. Ignore the latter part (on GR), until you've CAREFULLY read through the SR part at least twice, and maybe even three times.

Also, read (until you fully understand) the appendix on the derivation of the Lorentz equations.

Mike Fontenot
 
  • #5
Anthony24 said:
Okay I am a high school school student trying to learn the components of relativity, but i can't find anything that really explains any of it with examples and actual numbers. Does anyone know of a good place to learn this? I just feel stuck with high school education in the field of physics.

This lecture series helped me immensely: http://www.youtube.com/stanford#g/c/6C8BDEEBA6BDC78D
 
  • #6
Actually you can learn this to a place that no one can disturb you if you are studying this lessons components of relativity, but i can't find anything that really explains any of it with examples and actual numbers. Does anyone know of a good place to learn this? I just feel stuck with high school education in the field of physics.
 
  • #7
but you must to understand about that lesson because if you are locking with one lesson it is difficult for you to understand that..
 
  • #8
For me you should accomplish that lesson for you because it is very helpful because if you encountered that you can say that it is very easy..
 
  • #9
Fredrik said:
You should start with a presentation of SR that emphasizes spacetime diagrams. Lots of people here say that the book by Taylor & Wheeler is the best choice. (I haven't read it myself). You should also do a search for similar threads. JesseM posted a bunch of links to online resources in one of them.
Here's the thread you're referring to:

https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=441257
 

1. What is relativity?

Relativity is a theory developed by Albert Einstein in the early 20th century that explains how objects in motion behave and the effects of gravity on those objects. It is based on the idea that the laws of physics are the same for all observers, regardless of their relative motion.

2. Why is it important to learn about relativity?

Relativity is important because it has fundamentally changed our understanding of the universe. It has led to advancements in technology, such as GPS, and has helped us better understand the behavior of objects in extreme conditions, such as near black holes.

3. What are the two types of relativity?

The two types of relativity are special relativity and general relativity. Special relativity deals with objects moving at constant speeds, while general relativity deals with the effects of gravity on objects.

4. Do I need a strong background in math to understand relativity?

While a strong background in math can certainly be helpful, it is not necessary to understand relativity. Many concepts can be explained using analogies and visual aids, and there are also simplified explanations available for those without a strong math background.

5. Can relativity be proven?

Relativity has been extensively tested and has been shown to be consistent with all known observations. While it cannot be proven definitively, the overwhelming evidence supporting its principles makes it a widely accepted and well-supported theory.

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