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Where to purchase a 1.7 GHz Oscillator

  1. Oct 22, 2009 #1
    Hi guys,

    I was just wondering of there is any companies that manufactures a 1.7 Ghz oscillators ?

    For the thing I need, I have a stable supply of voltage and I need a specfic frequencey, the one mentioned above. So a VCO, I think, is not the solution as some of you may suggest.

    Please, if you now companies that do manufacture them I would greatly appreciate your help,


    thanks
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 22, 2009 #2

    berkeman

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    Staff: Mentor

    What is the application? What power level?
     
  4. Oct 23, 2009 #3
    Well the output of the oscillator will be connected to a horn antenna, and from its characteristics, the least attenuation occurs at this frequencey.

    I prefer that the oscillator have a wide range of inputs and produces a correspnding output, with the freq. unchanged.

    If you want a specific value, then it would be 25 watts as an output.of the oscillator.
     
  5. Oct 23, 2009 #4
    A typical scheme is to have an LO chain or a synthesizer, and then feed it to a power amp.

    there is many manufactures making these for defense, and they are quite expensive, try googling. But on ebay, you many find oscillators that are not manufactured anymore for a fraction of the cost.

    some of the manufactures I'm familiar with:

    macom, herley, miteq or microsource.

    I don't know if they are still making "microwave bricks" that you get for any frequency.
     
  6. Oct 23, 2009 #5

    f95toli

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    Science Advisor
    Gold Member


    25 W is equal to 44 dBm, that is LOT of power for a microwave circuit. You can certainly buy power amplifiers that can do this (you can buy amplifiers meant for e.g. radar that will give you kW of power); but it is well outside what you can get out of a typical "lab" amplifer (they will typically give you 15 dBm at most).
    Hence, an amplifer like this is likely to be quite expensive.
     
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