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Where to start learning electronics engineering on my own?

  1. Apr 29, 2017 #1
    Ok so I am in love with electronics and now I want to start learning from the bottom to the top, so that means physics and math, what are beginning topics that I must cover before jumping to circuit analysis and theory?

    I have a dream and planning to invent new digital device like smarthphone, ipod. So I am trying to find where to begin, can someone help me, please!!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 29, 2017 #2

    berkeman

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    Welcome to the PF.

    What level is your education so far? High school? Trade school? What math have you had so far?

    I really like the book "The Art of Electronics" by Horowitz and Hill as a basic introduction to electronics. If you have a technical library nearby, see if you can look through the book to see if it interests you. If you like it you could try to buy a used one on Amazon.
     
  4. Apr 29, 2017 #3
    Thanks!

    So my knowledge of math is in middle I know algebra and trigonometry, but now I dont know whether to go on calculus.

    I know book Art of Electronics and I think that I am not ready for that book yet.
     
  5. Apr 29, 2017 #4

    berkeman

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    If you love electronics, then yes, you should learn calculus. It's pretty hard to get comfortable with circuits that have inductors and capacitors in them without at least a basic understanding of calculus, IMO.

    You can also look at building some basic electronics kits. That's a fun and practical way to start learning more about electronics and how to put things together. Have you found any good websites for buying basic electronics kits? It's the most fun to put something together that you can actually use in your real life, like an electronic clock kit. :smile:
     
  6. Apr 29, 2017 #5
    Ok I need calculus I know that but I need guidelines do I start with calculus? And what physics topics I learn first is it electromagnetism?

    Well I am from small European country and I dont know any sites from which I can buy online electroc kit.
     
  7. Apr 29, 2017 #6

    anorlunda

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    Your enthusiasm sounds good. Book learning, and learning from kits are two paths that can be followed in parallel.

    I have always been impressed by how effective Khan Academy is at teaching. You can learn calculus and differential equations there, which is the prerequisite that @berkeman mentioned. You can also learn basic electricity and circuits there. The web site tracks your progress and comprehension.

    It is free and simple to get started at Khan. You can't get a degree there to qualify for a job, but you can get a lot of useful understanding.

    https://www.khanacademy.org
     
  8. Apr 29, 2017 #7
  9. Apr 29, 2017 #8
    Yes I have very good enthusiasm for electronics

    I know Khan Academy I watched Khan but I am not comfortable with videos I love books, I think books are good for beginning.

    I need to collact topics first from 1. to n...
    Like first I need to learn on example:
    1. Electromagnetisam
    2. DC
    3.AC
    4. circuit theory etc..
    If you know what I am saying
     
  10. Apr 29, 2017 #9
    Yes Wikipedia is a good resource of everything but it is too short, and no guidelines what to learn first.. I am beginner
    I need specific topics from math and topics from physics in order
     
  11. Apr 29, 2017 #10
    There are links at the end of articles, which go into more depth,
    Anyway, figure out what transistors do first, then try to build a simple transistor audio amplifier.
    Something which could take the audio output of a phone and amplify enough so you can hear it on a small loudspeaker.
    It should only cost few euros or dollars for the components, circuit diagrams for that kind of thing are all over the net.
    You can even get educational packages for that sort of thing.
    Try google this "hobby electronics kits"
     
  12. Apr 29, 2017 #11
    I see but I am not here for hobby I want to build career as a engineer so first thing is theory and then I put that into practice.
     
  13. Apr 29, 2017 #12

    anorlunda

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    In that case, you will probably need a four year degree from a university. Self-taught learning is not usually recognized as a qualification for getting a job. It sounds like you really need some career guidance. Perhaps the last school that you went to is willing to help you with guidance.

    Edit: Software and programming are an exception. In many cases, programmers are hired for skills, not qualifications. But you mentioned chip design. You definitely need an engineering degree for that.
     
  14. Apr 30, 2017 #13
    I cant get into that university.

    And I am not planning to get job, I am planning to create my own.
     
  15. Apr 30, 2017 #14

    Vanadium 50

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    That doesn't sound to me like a very good plan. With no credentials and no track record, who do you expect to pay you? And to do what?
     
  16. Apr 30, 2017 #15
    I am planning to make my own electronics company of digital devices like Apple and Samsung Electronics, but no phones or any known device.
     
  17. Apr 30, 2017 #16

    Vanadium 50

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    So your plan is:
    1. Read some books on electronics
    2. Invent something nobody has thought of
    3. Build a multi-hundred billion dollar company around it
    4. Enjoy your newfound wealth
    I don't think this is a very good plan. If it were that simple, everyone would do it.
     
  18. Apr 30, 2017 #17
    Nope my plan is:
    1. Learn everything that I need for VLSI design from basics to the high level.
    2. In the meantime I will start electronics hobby and learn how circuits and components works
    And then I will start designing device.

    I didnt say thai is simple at all I know it going to be very very hard, and I am prepared to work very hard.
     
  19. Apr 30, 2017 #18

    anorlunda

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    Do you know that it takes teams of dozens or hundreds of designers for a single VLSI chip? They also need the support of software tools costing millions of dollars.
     
  20. Apr 30, 2017 #19
    I am not planning to design it alone of course, but I
    I didn't know that.

    So what it takes, what courses are required for designing a digital device?
     
  21. Apr 30, 2017 #20

    anorlunda

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    You would first need a course in circuit analysis (covers both DC and AC). Then semiconductors. Then digital circuits. Then VLSI design. I am really not qualified to suggest a complete course of study and specific textbooks for you.

    I hesitate to suggest this. I don't want to waste your money. The following book costs $17.50. It would give you a better idea about how big a subject it is. The book could not teach you starting at your level today, but it could serve to show you that it is much more complicated than you imagine.
    https://www.amazon.com/VLSI-Design-...F8&qid=1493580093&sr=8-5&keywords=vlsi+design

    What about your local library? Might you find a book on VLSI design there?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 8, 2017
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