Which accent of the English language is your favourite?

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  • #51
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i was born there. the really good southern accents are getting harder to find. you really don't ever get much more than a caricature on television, and people just aren't as isolated as they used to be, so you don't hear people say stuff like "yeller toyoter" much anymore.

one of my faves is the accent they used in the movie Fargo. i guess it's a minnesota/north dakota thing. never been up that way, tho, to hear for myself.

I know what you mean. I heard a good one at a store recently. The clerk was from rural Mississippi. She had a neat accent.
 
  • #52
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My local public radio station relays BBC international radio in the evenings, and I grew increasingly more irritated at the deletion and insertion of the letter R in random words. 'Farmer' becomes 'Famah' and 'Obama' becomes 'Obamer'. Just last night I heard 'Indiar' (India). What's up with that?

Another one that bugged me the other day was 'controversy'. They say 'con troversy'. As if there was a such thing as a 'troversy' that something is contrary to. I expect 'contro versy', the meaning of which is easier to parse in my opinion - contro to a verse, or spoken word. Verse, contro-verse, not troverse, con-troverse.
 
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  • #53
Redbelly98
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I have a client in Boston and it cracks me up to listen to their auto-attendant when I call them. Got to love people that have social gatherings they call a "potty". :tongue2:

Did you ever notice Boston has a lot of women named Bob, and men named Bonnie?

Hmmm, my favorite accents are probably Irish, the Fargo accent, and Maine/northern New England. I find French Canadian can be pretty amusing too.
 
  • #54
I like the geordie accent:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pImvSXaNduo

But as far as the one I'd say I'd like the best I think it'd be a tie between a gentrified American Southerner Gone With The Wind accent - "Ah wish a cannon ball 'd fall right down on yah head!" and a totally Rastafarianized Jamaican accent.
 
  • #55
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My new daughter-in -law is from Yorkshire. I really have a hard time understanding her, but this is improving. She seem to leave out the consonants in the middle of the word, sort of like the Ska-ish

I have gotten the shorter words figured out; water is WA -AH, hard is hod, and waiter is wa-er. The multisyllabic words are still driving me nuts.

Is this normal speech for the Yorkshire area??
 
  • #56
Kurdt
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Is this normal speech for the Yorkshire area??

Yes. They like implying the word 'the' as well.
 
  • #57
mgb_phys
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Consonants cost money tha knows - the dun wan go wasting em.
 
  • #58
Hurkyl
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I'm partial to a thin Australian accent. Of course, it might just have been which girl had the accent....

I worked with a girl from Michigan, she had a ruuf on her house and ate ruut vegetables like carrots.
:confused: I can't say that I've ever noticed anyone pronouncing those two words in any other way. I'm thinking what you wrote was meant to be the first of the two pronounciations listed here. (I tried listening to the other one. It hurt my ears! :cry:)
 
  • #59
brewnog
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Is Stoke and/or Warwickshire representative for Black Country accent?

Definitely not! The Stoke accent is part Yorkshire, part Lancashire with a Scouse twang.
 
  • #60
I worked with a girl from Michigan, she had a ruuf on her house and ate ruut vegetables like carrots.

I had a mathematics professor from Michigan too who would always be telling us to take the square ruut and cube ruut, etc...
 
  • #61
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I like the British accent, and for here in the US, I like the Boston accent.
 
  • #62
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Gotta love the Caribbean accent like how they speak in Jamaica and the Dominican Republic.


Worst has to be the accent in Minnesota/Wisconsin/Dakotas. When I was there I could barely understand them sometimes. Southern accents among the less educated and super hardcore blue collar workers are also very incomprehensible.
 
  • #63
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:confused: I can't say that I've ever noticed anyone pronouncing those two words in any other way. I'm thinking what you wrote was meant to be the first of the two pronounciations listed here. (I tried listening to the other one. It hurt my ears! :cry:)
The second example they give is more like the one she used, more like "rough" than "roof". Kind of like the Jetson's dog Astro talking. Egads, the second pronunciation for "root" is close to how she said it, but there is no way I can describe it exactly. http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/root
 
  • #64
Art
My local public radio station relays BBC international radio in the evenings, and I grew increasingly more irritated at the deletion and insertion of the letter R in random words. 'Farmer' becomes 'Famah' and 'Obama' becomes 'Obamer'. Just last night I heard 'Indiar' (India). What's up with that?

Another one that bugged me the other day was 'controversy'. They say 'con troversy'. As if there was a such thing as a 'troversy' that something is contrary to. I expect 'contro versy', the meaning of which is easier to parse in my opinion - contro to a verse, or spoken word. Verse, contro-verse, not troverse, con-troverse.
According to the Oxford English Dictionary con troversy should indeed be pronounced contro versy and farmer should be pronounced with a soft 'r' like fahmer. The BBC's standards must be slipping.
 
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  • #65
epenguin
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According to the Oxford English Dictionary con troversy should indeed be pronounced contro versy and farmer should be pronounced with a soft 'r' like fahmer. The BBC's standards must be slipping.

This appears controversial. I am not certain how to read these ways of rendering the pronunciation and it seems to me clearer if we put an accent ' after the stressed syllable. Then in traditional educated English English it has always been contro'versy and not controvers'y nor con'troversy. Which may be held not logical as the stress is on the least meaning-functional syllable, and the same traditional standard has controver'sial. But there are plenty of other examples of this and it amounts to a rule.

Another accentuation change in course in English English is a a tendency for dispute' which is S. English and to give way to N. English dis'pute. There must be many other examples.
 
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  • #66
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Hellou, erverybady, is there an acually hugely strong accent Marie can fall for ?
I love all accents if I can understand all ofwhat they mean
 
  • #67
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I have gotten the shorter words figured out; water is WA -AH, hard is hod, and waiter is wa-er. The multisyllabic words are still driving me nuts.

Is this normal speech for the Yorkshire area??

Well, I'm from Yorkshire. It's quite common, but still there's different accents from different parts of Yorkshire. I used to have a hard time understanding some people with a strong Yorkshire accent, and I was brought up there.
 
  • #68
brewnog
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Well, I'm from Yorkshire. It's quite common, but still there's different accents from different parts of Yorkshire. I used to have a hard time understanding some people with a strong Yorkshire accent, and I was brought up there.

I'm Yorkshire born and bred, and while I have no trouble with accents from most of Yorkshire, some Barnsley folk can really confuse me.
 
  • #69
mgb_phys
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I'm Yorkshire born and bred, and while I have no trouble with accents from most of Yorkshire, some Barnsley folk can really confuse me.
That's cos it's hard for mere mortals to rise to our intellectual level.
 
  • #70
Kurdt
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argh! There are hundreds of you.
 
  • #71
lisab
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argh! There are hundreds of you.

...they walk among us...:eek:
 
  • #72
mgb_phys
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...they walk among us...:eek:

z1.jpg
 
  • #73
Danger
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Well, I'm from Yorkshire.
Begone, heathen!

I'm Yorkshire born and bred
You too.


Love your pudding, though... :uhh:
 

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