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Which engineering branch to opt for Nanotechnology

  1. Jun 5, 2013 #1

    AGNuke

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    I've finally given my college entrance test (The IIT-JEE). And I am expecting a decent rank to join in one of the premier institutes of India.

    I want to pursue my interests in Nanotechnology, because I think it has a great scope for future research and I want to do the same. But I don't know which branch to take so as to get the knowledge aimed at Nanotech.

    So I'd like to know via which of the following courses will I be able to learn about Nanotechnology and be more able to pursue further career in it - (these are the probable options for me). Please explain me what I can expect to learn under these branches.

    1. Biotechnology - I have a feeling it has something to do with engineering the nanomachines of the nature itself - the cells.

    2. Engineering Physics OR (w/ Specialization in Nano Science)* - I am not sure if I can get it with latter, but still, is this the real deal?

    Also, I'd appreciate if you give me your personal inputs on this, on how to plan my academic future. I'd surely give a good thinking to them.
     
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  3. Jun 8, 2013 #2

    AGNuke

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    I want a career prospect in Carbon Nanotechnology. And according to my findings, Materials Science deals with the exotic material, carbon nanostructures being no exception.

    I'd really appreciate if someone enlighten me regarding the career prospects should I take up this Materials Science branch...
     
  4. Jun 8, 2013 #3
    Sounds like you've got it right already. Engineering physics or materials science should be the best bets, although it probably varies from uni to uni, and what you would like your plan B to be. If you are 100% set on nano, both would probably be fine.
     
  5. Jun 8, 2013 #4

    AGNuke

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    I got confused after reading the name Nanoscience in the Engineering Physics' specialization course, but I suppose it is not about the Nanoscience I was hoping, which is Carbon Nanoscience (Fullerenes, Nanotubes and now hot Graphene), on wikipedia, Materials Science clearly depicts its dealing with Carbon Nanomaterial.

    I am also aware about the variation each institution is to offer. But it is my belief that the core structure of the branch shouldn't deviate too much. As for what I'll miss out (in this case, Nanotech), I'll try to look into it from other sources.

    What I am really concerned about is the career prospect in Materials Science, in case things don't know my way (it generally doesn't go by the way). I need to know, in worst case scenario, where I'll end up.

    As for Plan B, I can join Computer Science at a lower leveled institute, while it'll guarantee a staple career, I don't want to be mere carpet-dweller.
     
  6. Jun 8, 2013 #5
    Nano isn't an established discipline like mechanical engineering so there's a good chance the local curriculums will vary extremely widely, especially given the inter-disciplinary flavor of nanoscience. Just sayin'
     
  7. Jun 8, 2013 #6

    AGNuke

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    Good Point. Can't argue with it. But still, there's an overall taste of Materials Science, which deals in different materials, like Ceramics, Refractory, etc. so even if I can't get away with NanoTech, at least the more established materials can provide me a viable career option. So, my question simply shift to the Career Prospect in this discipline.
     
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