Which kind of graphing calculator should I buy?

In summary, the conversation is about choosing a calculator for upcoming math and science courses. The teachers have stopped supplying TI-83s and the person's dad suggests the HP 50g, but the teachers use TIs. The person is considering the TI-89 Titanium or possibly getting a TI Nspire from the school. They clarify that they are taking a combined pre-calc and calc course due to being in the IB program. The importance of having the same calculator as the teacher for ease of following along in lessons is emphasized. Some recommendations and personal experiences with different calculators are shared. The conversation ends with the suggestion to get the TI-89 for future math courses.
  • #1
stephen92
7
0
I'm having a bit of a problem with choosing a calculator, I am taking algebra 2 and Honors Chem and plan to take calculus AP Chem and Physics next year. The teachers have stopped supplying the TI-83s and I need to know what to invest in. My dad has insited I go with the HP 50g as he is an enginner but all the teachers use TI's. Any suggestions?
 
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  • #2
I'm in the same situation as you right now, I will probably be getting the TI-89 Titanium if I do not get one next year from my teachers.. Supposedly, our school is ordering the TI NSpires for the Calc AP kids.

Wierd that you aren't taking precalc but Alg 2.. thought it was like nearly required to take precalc prior to Calc.
 
  • #3
I am in the IB (International Bacchalorate) program, it mixes the two (pre-calc and Calc) into one year-long course, or at least that is what I heard, right now though I'm a 10th grader so I'm taking Hon/Pre-IB Algebra 2
 
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  • #4
buy mine. I won one and I don't need 2

Casio CFX-9850GC Plus
 
  • #5
If your teachers are using TIs then I would definitely recommend grabbing one. In fact if you know that they are going to be using TI-83s than you should be. It makes it easier to follow along in lessons when the teacher says "Push these buttons". If you had an HP it probably does not have the same buttons.

Now it can probably do the same things the TI can do, but consider that the teacher can not take time out of a lesson plan to help you figure out how to do something on your calculator that they are not familiar with. Which means you would have to figure it out yourself, or perhaps stay after class for extra help.

Even some of the TIs have very different interfaces. The 83 and the 89 definitely do have slightly different menus which makes continuity with the teachers plans difficult. This is why I recommend trying to get the exact calculator your teacher is using.
 
  • #6
I'm very satisfied with my TI-84 Plus, it is very user friendly. I agree with Diffy:smile:
 
  • #7
Any graphing calculator is fine as long as you know how to use it. I can let you know, however, that after using the TI-89, I feel handicapped when using calculators like the 84. At your current level, the 84 will probably do (although sometimes you might wish you had the 89's solve function). In my opinion, if you are going to invest in a calculator that you will take onto higher level math courses, definitely get the 89.
 

Related to Which kind of graphing calculator should I buy?

1. What features should I look for in a graphing calculator?

Some important features to consider when buying a graphing calculator are the ability to graph multiple functions, perform complex calculations, store equations and variables, and have a large display screen.

2. Do I need a specific brand or model of graphing calculator?

There are several reputable brands of graphing calculators, such as Texas Instruments, Casio, and HP. It is important to read reviews and compare features to determine which brand and model will best suit your needs.

3. How much should I expect to spend on a graphing calculator?

The cost of a graphing calculator can vary greatly depending on the brand, model, and features. On average, a basic graphing calculator can range from $50 to $100, while more advanced models can cost upwards of $200.

4. Can I use a graphing calculator for standardized tests like the SAT or ACT?

Most standardized tests have specific guidelines for approved calculators. It is important to check with the test administrator or on their website to ensure the graphing calculator you are considering is allowed for the test.

5. Are there any alternative options to buying a graphing calculator?

There are several free graphing calculator apps available for smartphones and tablets. However, these may not have all the features and capabilities of a traditional graphing calculator. Additionally, some schools may provide graphing calculators for student use.

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