Which Science Non-Fiction Books Should You Read?

In summary: In this book, Eagleman takes the reader on a fascinating journey through the history of the brain and how it has changed over time. He covers topics such as the perception of time, the origins of language, consciousness, and the neurology of addiction.One of the most interesting parts of this book is Eagleman's discussion of the "neuroplasticity" of the brain. He argues that the brain is not static, but rather can learn and adapt in response to stimuli. This book is a great resource for anyone interested in neuroscience, psychology, or the history of the brain.In summary, David Eagleman discusses the history of the brain, its neurology, and its potential for adaptation in response to stimuli.
  • #1
ISamson
Gold Member
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Hello.

I am very keen on reading science non-fiction books on basically all science topics especially physics, chemistry, technology and neuroscience. I would like to dedicate this thread to some suggestions of particularly enjoyed non-fiction books with some very short reviews and opinions.
I value any contributions.
Thank you.

IS.
 
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  • #2
I have recently read some amazing books:
Michio Kaku - The Future of the Mind

Professor of theoretical physics talks about the advances of technology and how this will affect future research of the neurological system and the mind. Mental illnesses, telekinesis, consciousness, AI and more.

The book discusses various possibilities of advanced technology that can alter the brain and mind. Looking into things such as telepathy, telekinesis, consciousness, artificial intelligence, and transhumanism, the book covers a wide range of topics. In it, Kaku proposes a "spacetime theory of consciousness". Similarly to Ray Kurzweil, he believes the advances in silicon computing will serve our needs as opposed to producing a generation of robot overlords.

Ian Stewart - Calculating the Cosmos, How Mathematics Unveils the Universe

Professor of mathematics explains some astronomical and cosmological concepts and what a huge role of discovering them mathematics has played and continues playing on scientific breakthroughs and discoveries.

Stephen Hawking - A Brief History of Time

Professor Hawking takes us through the most innovative recent discoveries and advances of physics in the last century or so. From black holes to String theory.I also have another book by Michio Kaku (which I have not yet started reading) entitled "Parallel Worlds".
The book has twelve chapters arranged in three parts. Part I (Chapters 1-4) covers the Big Bang, the early development of the Universe, and how these topics relate to the Eternal Inflation Multiverse (Level II in the Tegmark hierarchy of Multiverses). Part II (Chapters 5-9) covers M-Theory and the Everett interpretation of Quantum Mechanics (Level III Multiverse). It also discusses how future technology will enable the creation of wormholes. Part III discusses the Big Freeze and how a Hyperspace wormhole (one in 11-dimensional Hyperspace rather than 3-dimensional normal space) will enable civilization and life to escape to a younger Universe.

In Parallel Worlds, Kaku presents many of the leading theories in physics; from Newtonian physics to Relativity to Quantum Physics to String theory and even into the newest version of string theory, called M-theory. He makes available to the reader a comprehensive description of many of the more compelling theories in physics, including many interesting predictions each theory makes, what physicists, astronomers, and cosmologists are looking for now and what technology they are using in their search.
 
  • #3
The First Three Minutes by Steven Weinberg
The Particle at the End of the Universe by Sean Carroll
The Cold Wars: A History of Superconductivity by Jean Matricon

Those are the three pop science books that got me to pursue physics.

The Brain: The Story of You by David Eagleman

David Eagleman is the Carl Sagan of neuroscience.
 
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Related to Which Science Non-Fiction Books Should You Read?

1. What are the key elements to look for in a science non-fiction book review?

The key elements to look for in a science non-fiction book review are a summary of the book's main ideas and arguments, an evaluation of the book's accuracy and relevance, and a comparison to other books on the same topic. It should also include the reviewer's overall opinion and recommendation.

2. How can I determine the credibility of a science non-fiction book review?

The credibility of a science non-fiction book review can be determined by checking the credentials of the reviewer, the publication or website where the review is published, and the sources cited by the reviewer. It is also helpful to read multiple reviews from different sources to get a well-rounded understanding of the book.

3. Should I read a science non-fiction book review before or after reading the book?

It is recommended to read a science non-fiction book review after reading the book. This allows you to form your own opinions and interpretations of the book before being influenced by someone else's review. However, if you are deciding whether or not to read a book, a review can help you determine if it is worth your time.

4. Can a science non-fiction book review contain spoilers?

Yes, a science non-fiction book review can contain spoilers. It is important for the reviewer to clearly indicate if there are any spoilers in the review, so the reader can choose whether or not to continue reading. However, it is generally expected for a reviewer to reveal some key information about the book in order to give an accurate and thorough evaluation.

5. Is it necessary to have a background in science to understand and write a science non-fiction book review?

It is not necessary to have a background in science to understand and write a science non-fiction book review. However, it can be helpful to have a basic understanding of the subject matter in order to accurately evaluate the book and its arguments. It is also important for the reviewer to clearly communicate any technical concepts in a way that is understandable to the general audience.

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