Why aren't we immune to spiders

  • Thread starter DannyC
  • Start date
In summary, the conversation discusses the topic of spiders and their venom, questioning why humans are not immune to their venom. The conversation also touches on the evolutionary aspect of immunity and the possibility of developing immunity in the future. It also mentions that not all spider bites are dangerous to humans and explains the reasons behind this. The conversation ends with a humorous remark about someone being given internet access while under the influence of alcohol.
  • #1
DannyC
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Ok, now as usual if you need information on something you research, i get fed up with letting people know how to use "google" to look up information about what theyre asking, but the reason I am asking this here, without any research has a reason.

Spiders... a lot are quite venomous, but we arent we immune to this?

They are not part of our food chain, and we are not part of theres.

So it can't be a defence mech for them, because "apart from the sheer arrogance of standing on them" would they originally have to poison us to possibly even disable us?

There's probably lots of other animals you could shove into replacement of a spider, but I am very curious, as I am going to be starting some intensive yet quick research of the House Spider after christmas, especially the AHS (aggressive house spider), and I am pretty curious on some 'factual' replies on here, or semi factual with maybe some theories chucked in?

There could be a million myths on other websites if I google it, and probably 3 billion theories without logic, not only that, I am half tanked on carling extra cold, but what the hell... i want to conversate this topic :rolleyes:
 
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  • #2
"Spiders... [a lot] are quite venomous, but [aren't] we immune to this? They are not part of our food chain, and we are not part of [theirs]."

If that's the core of your question, I think the reason is that poisons use some chemical means to work, and the chemistry of life is very similar across the different species. A venom may be more or less lethal to us compared to the normal prey, but it can still hurt us a lot and in some cases cause severe reactions and death.
 
  • #3
Damn spelling with lager :rolleyes:

Ok, so if we look at this from some form of 'realistic' view from what we already know of "the point of life" then could it just be coincidence that we aren't immune to it/them? Or maybe a mis-happ upon development? Is moi making sense, or just drunk...
 
  • #4
I think i was bitten by a spider, whilst visiting the water closet, i had a 1/2inch lump for a week.
 
  • #5
DannyC said:
Ok, so if we look at this from some form of 'realistic' view from what we already know of "the point of life" then could it just be coincidence that we aren't immune to it/them? Or maybe a mis-happ upon development? Is moi making sense, or just drunk...
Mostly (b). But I think there are some cases in evolution where a species has developed an immunity over time to certain poisons that its prey uses in self-defense. Help me out here with some examples -- I know there are some, but none come immediately to mind. Like the mongoose and the cobra or something...:rolleyes:
 
  • #6
Butterflies and food plants?

Yer, I get what you mean, so maybe over a course of the next 20,000 years we could expect near enough complete immunity... :eek:
 
  • #7
DannyC said:
Yer, I get what you mean, so maybe over a course of the next 20,000 years we could expect near enough complete immunity... :eek:
Er, no. Evolution does not happen on demand, and not in 20,000 years. To do it quickly, you'll need some genetic engineering.
 
  • #8
We aren't immune to spider bites because we don't get bitten often enough to develop any sort of immunity. That is, if there isn't an allergic response that would get worse with repeated exposure rather than better.

Most spider bites won't do more than make us a little itchy, no worse than a mosquito. The few that are poisonous to us are so mostly because their poison acts on their prey in the same way it acts on us. In many cases, the venoms contain neurotoxins, and since neurons in humans have very similar physiology to neurons in insects, they aren't species-specific. Other dangerous venoms are ones that destroy cells, any cells, so again, they act on us because they are non-specific.
 
  • #9
FWIW -
Soem spider species and relatives lack the "fang power" to penetrate deeply enough through our skin to cause a big problem, i.e., more than a small bump.

Example: Daddy-longlegs.
 
  • #10
I'm sorry, what exactly is the question being asked here?

Why are spiders venomous?
Why are we not immune? (Why would we be?)
Why did someone give DannyC internet access when he's been drinking?
Why are people responding to someone who's been given internet access when he's been drinking?
 

Related to Why aren't we immune to spiders

1. Why aren't humans naturally immune to spider venom?

While some animals, such as certain reptiles and insects, have developed a natural immunity to spider venom, humans have not. This is because our immune system is not specifically adapted to counteract the specific toxins found in spider venom.

2. Can humans develop an immunity to spider venom?

Yes, it is possible for humans to develop an immunity to spider venom through repeated exposure to small doses of the venom. However, this process can be dangerous and should only be done under the supervision of a trained medical professional.

3. Do all spiders have the same type of venom?

No, there are over 45,000 known species of spiders and each species has its own unique venom composition. Some spiders have venom that is harmless to humans, while others can cause severe reactions.

4. Can spider venom be used for medicinal purposes?

Yes, some components of spider venom have been found to have potential medicinal properties. For example, a protein found in the venom of the Brazilian wandering spider has been studied for its potential to treat erectile dysfunction.

5. How do spiders use their venom to catch prey?

Spiders use their venom as a defense mechanism and to immobilize their prey. The venom is injected into their prey through their fangs and contains toxins that paralyze the victim, making it easier for the spider to consume it.

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