Why do I hate touching velvet?

  • Thread starter RuroumiKenshin
  • Start date
In summary, the conversation centered around the topic of one person's aversion to velvet. They explained that they do not like the material due to a physical reaction of getting goose bumps and feeling frustrated. Others suggested potential reasons for this aversion, such as a medical condition or a past traumatic experience. The conversation also touched on the idea of OCD and how it may be related to this aversion. Some also shared their own opinions on velvet, stating that they find it beautiful or that they have no strong feelings towards it. In conclusion, the conversation suggests that this aversion to velvet may be a psychological association formed from a past negative experience.
  • #1
RuroumiKenshin
Eew! Velvet!

I don't like velvet. It's odd, I know but the reason why I don't like velvet is not as simple as " I just don't". It just so happens that when I touch velvet, I start getting goose bumps, (even just thinking about it..) and eventually get frustrated (and eventually angry at the velvet). So why does this happen? What kind of chemical reaction causes me to get goose bumps when I touch the velvet?
 
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  • #2
Obviously repressed conflict toward Elvis (the Velvet) Presley.
 
  • #3
I don't listen to Elvis. This is a serious matter. Anyone else have any ideas?
 
  • #4
You could have a medical condition, like your nerves or something. Or maybe you had a traumatic velvet incident in your early childhood...
 
  • #5
She wore EewwwwwwWW Velvet...

I suspect it is all in your mind (though that is chemical too) not some chemical process taking place between your fingers and the material.
How are you when it comes to fingernails being run across a blackboard, any cringing?
 
  • #6
Consider Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD). Consult your physician for an accurate diagnosis if this condition interferes with your well being.
 
  • #7
if your seriously freaked out like that you should see a doctor and have them recommend a specialist in associative behaviors. or something like that i can't remember what its called exactly?
 
  • #8
screwball-

If this is actually an illness, it is more likely related to OCD than to dissociative disorders. "Velvet" may thus be subconsciously and irrationally associated with tactile "uncleanliness."
 
  • #9
I think velvet is very, very beautiful and everything, but when I touch it, (with finger nails especially) I get goose bumps. Even just thinking about it. I get a tickling sensation, and thhen I get goosebumps. The only time I don't get goose bumps is when I'm touching it with the palms of my hands.

Boulderhead:
I'm very neutral to noises like finger nails being run across a black board. I don't like silence; I'm always listening to music of some sort (NEVER rap!).
 
  • #10
A friend of mine loved to stroke her sons' heads after they got a "buzz cut." I think velvet is far cry from stroking a cat, dog, bunny, etc. or intimate relation. Adopt a pet if you can accept the responsibility, or (seriously) visit a petting zoo. The animals there are wonderful to the touch!
 
  • #11
I think it is a psychological aquisition created by an association with a painfull or alarming thing in childhood. I read that in the 60's, tests were done on babies (tests which are now outlawed)to see if this was true. Toddlers were put in an empty room with something like a rabbit or a soft blanket, and they liked it. A few hours later, they introduced the harmless items back in, this time with a loud bell (similar to a school bell). This alarming bell made the baby cry. They repeated this same thing 10 or so times, and waited for 3 days. After 3 days, a rabbit was put in front of the baby. Without a bell or any other alarms or harm, the baby began to cry. The same results came with the blanket. This is often why people are terribly afraid of harmless things such as clowns. I don't think it is so much as a chemical condition, but more of an acquired fear of something.
 
  • #12
I would drape myself in velvet if it were socialy acceptable.

eNtRopY
 

Related to Why do I hate touching velvet?

1. Why does touching velvet make me cringe?

There could be a few reasons why touching velvet may make you cringe. One possibility is that you have a sensory processing sensitivity, which means certain textures or sensations may feel overwhelming or unpleasant to you. Another reason could be that you have a negative association with velvet, perhaps from a past experience or cultural influence.

2. Is it normal to dislike the feeling of velvet?

While it is not uncommon for people to have preferences for certain textures, it may be worth exploring if your aversion to velvet is causing significant distress or impacting your daily life. If so, it may be helpful to speak with a therapist or occupational therapist to better understand and manage your sensory sensitivities.

3. Can hating velvet be a sign of a larger issue?

In most cases, disliking the feeling of velvet is not indicative of a larger issue. However, if this aversion is causing significant distress or impacting your daily life, it may be worth exploring with a mental health professional to rule out any underlying conditions.

4. Is there a scientific reason behind why I hate touching velvet?

While there is not a definitive scientific reason for why individuals may dislike the feeling of velvet, some research suggests that it may be related to differences in sensory processing and sensitivity. Additionally, cultural influences and personal experiences may also play a role in our preferences for certain textures.

5. Can I overcome my aversion to velvet?

It is possible to overcome your aversion to velvet, but it may take some time and practice. One approach is to gradually expose yourself to the texture of velvet in a controlled and safe environment. Over time, this may help desensitize your brain to the unpleasant feeling and help you develop a more neutral or positive association with velvet. It may also be helpful to explore any underlying reasons or triggers for your aversion through therapy or self-reflection.

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