Why does a drip of water into water make a noise?

In summary, the 'gloop' noise is caused by the collision of two bodies, which creates vibrations in the molecules of the colliding surfaces. These vibrations then pass into the surrounding air and form sound waves. This is explained by the Navier-Stokes equations, which show that the air can act as a medium for pressure waves when disturbed by the motion of other bodies. Water, being incompressible, can only produce surface waves as opposed to bulk volume oscillations, which would result in a much lower frequency cutoff due to its viscosity and inability to effectively transfer energy to the air. Therefore, the 'gloop' noise for an ocean wave would be made up of many small drops making the same noise in close proximity, rather than
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What is the 'gloop' noise; what actually makes the energy noise (from gravitational/kinetic into ... what transformation?), how is that transformed energy then coupled into a propagating wave in air?

Further, whatever 'that' is, is it the same for an ocean wave, just godzilions of little drops all making the same noise close together in time and space, and if one could separate them out then the ocean would be one drip noise after another. Or something else?
 
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cmb said:
What is the 'gloop' noise; what actually makes the energy noise

A Q back at you ... why is a sound made when a hammer hits something ?

The reason is the same
 
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In terms of high school physics the collision of two bodies, creates vibration of the molecules on the two colliding surfaces and these vibrations pass into the surrounding air and form the sound waves.

In terms of graduate physics, Navier -Stokes equations which the air obeys as a fluid medium, have as solutions pressure waves in the medium when the medium (air in this case) is disturbed by the motion/vibration of other bodies.
 
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The hammer and anvil will vibrate because the materials they are made of are elastic and there is a bulk oscillation of volume once struck, leading to oscillations normal to the surface.

I understand that water is incompressible and that any waves that would carry away energy exchange to be surface waves, not bulk volume oscillations.

I could agree that some waves might be possible, but surely there would be quite a low frequency cutoff due to the viscosity of the water and its inability to couple the energy effectively to air, the amplitudes would be negligible for the spectrum of the 'plop' in the multi kHz range.
 

1. Why does a drip of water into water make a noise?

When a drip of water falls into a body of water, it creates a disturbance on the surface of the water. This disturbance is caused by the force of the falling water, which displaces the water molecules on the surface. This displacement creates ripples and vibrations, which travel through the water and produce sound waves that we can hear.

2. Why do some drips make a louder noise than others?

The loudness of the noise produced by a drip of water depends on several factors. The height from which the water is falling, the size and shape of the droplet, and the temperature and viscosity of the water can all affect the sound. A taller drop will create a larger disturbance and therefore a louder noise, while a smaller droplet may not create as much of a disturbance and produce a softer sound.

3. Is there a specific frequency or pitch to the sound of a dripping water?

The frequency or pitch of the sound produced by a dripping water can vary depending on the factors mentioned above. However, on average, the sound is usually in the range of 20-20,000 Hz, which is within the range of human hearing. The pitch can also be affected by the distance between the droplet and the surface of the water, with closer droplets producing higher-pitched sounds.

4. Can the sound of a dripping water be used for anything?

The sound of a dripping water may seem insignificant, but it can actually be used for various purposes. In music, the sound of dripping water has been incorporated into compositions to add a unique and natural element. In addition, some people find the sound of dripping water to be calming and use it for relaxation or meditation purposes.

5. Is there any scientific research on the sound of a dripping water?

Yes, there have been several studies and experiments conducted on the sound of dripping water. Scientists have looked at the factors that affect the sound, such as droplet size and temperature, and have also explored the potential uses of the sound. Some research has also focused on the psychological effects of the sound, such as its ability to induce relaxation or trigger certain emotions.

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