Why ∆u=Cv ∆T for isochoric transformation of non-ideal gases?

  • Thread starter maCrobo
  • Start date
51
1
I simply report what I read:
"For an ideal gas, but for every kind of transformation ∆u=Cv ∆T, while for every kind of material in the thermodynamic system, but only for isochoric transformation ∆u=Cv ∆T."

Where does this second statement come from?
Everything is clear about ideal gases, but I don't figure out how to prove the second part of this statement.
 
83
1
That is how Cv is defined.

Cv is the limit when ∆T goes to zero of ∆u/∆T. The first statement is simply a consequence of internal energy being dependant only of T for an ideal gas.
 
3,731
414
I simply report what I read:
"For an ideal gas, but for every kind of transformation ∆u=Cv ∆T, while for every kind of material in the thermodynamic system, but only for isochoric transformation ∆u=Cv ∆T."

Where does this second statement come from?
Everything is clear about ideal gases, but I don't figure out how to prove the second part of this statement.
It follows from the first principle of thermodynamics. In isochoric transformations the work (compression-expansion work) is zero so Δu=Qv.
 

Related Threads for: Why ∆u=Cv ∆T for isochoric transformation of non-ideal gases?

Replies
22
Views
3K
Replies
5
Views
1K
Replies
4
Views
4K
Replies
7
Views
27K
Replies
2
Views
3K
Replies
1
Views
3K

Physics Forums Values

We Value Quality
• Topics based on mainstream science
• Proper English grammar and spelling
We Value Civility
• Positive and compassionate attitudes
• Patience while debating
We Value Productivity
• Disciplined to remain on-topic
• Recognition of own weaknesses
• Solo and co-op problem solving

Hot Threads

Top