Work needed to flip cone upside down.

  • Thread starter bbhill
  • Start date
  • Tags
    Cone Work
In summary, to find the work needed to flip the cone upside down, one can integrate the force along the distance from 0 to 1 by multiplying the distance, cross section circle area, and density. Alternatively, one can use potential energy by finding the potential energy of the original cone and then the potential energy of the flipped cone.
  • #1
bbhill
6
0
Given the cone, z^2=x^2+y^2 z<= 1 filled with water, find the work needed to flip the cone upside down.



W = Fd



Well, I figured I could integrate the force along the distance (0,1) by multiplying the distance from 0 times the cross section circle area times the density. That would give me the force of the cone, but then I would need to find the distance each infinitesimally small cross section would have to be displaced to flip the cone and I've gotten lost there.
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
You'll find it a lot easier to use potential energy for this problem. Can you find the potential energy of the original cone and then the potential energy of the flipped cone?
 

Related to Work needed to flip cone upside down.

1. What is the concept of "Work needed to flip cone upside down"?

The concept refers to the amount of force or energy required to turn a cone upside down, with the tip at the bottom and the base at the top.

2. How is work related to flipping a cone upside down?

Work is defined as the product of force and displacement. Therefore, in order to flip a cone upside down, a certain amount of force needs to be applied over a distance, resulting in work being done.

3. What factors affect the amount of work needed to flip a cone upside down?

The main factors that affect the amount of work needed are the weight of the cone, the height of the cone, and the force applied to flip it. Other factors may include the texture and shape of the cone, as well as the surface it is being flipped on.

4. Is there a formula to calculate the work needed to flip a cone upside down?

Yes, the formula is W = mgh, where W is the work, m is the mass of the cone, g is the acceleration due to gravity, and h is the height of the cone. This formula assumes that the force applied is equal to the weight of the cone.

5. Why is it harder to flip a cone upside down on a rough surface compared to a smooth surface?

On a rough surface, there is more friction between the cone and the surface, which means more force needs to be applied to overcome this friction and flip the cone. On a smooth surface, there is less friction, making it easier to flip the cone with less force.

Similar threads

  • Calculus and Beyond Homework Help
Replies
10
Views
1K
Replies
11
Views
462
  • Calculus and Beyond Homework Help
Replies
6
Views
1K
  • Calculus and Beyond Homework Help
Replies
4
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
6
Views
1K
  • Calculus and Beyond Homework Help
Replies
3
Views
925
  • General Engineering
Replies
25
Views
9K
  • Mechanics
Replies
34
Views
5K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
7
Views
5K
  • Calculus and Beyond Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
4K
Back
Top