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X-ray's can cause demagnetization?

  1. Dec 13, 2013 #1
    I found this my mistake, it's amazing how for a very short period of time, Xray(and other lasers) can demagnetize a ferromagnets. This is still under research, but how can this be? Can anyone share what they know about this?
    Do you all think this is an effective method?
    Could it be more efficient than all the others?

    Sources:
    1, 2.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 13, 2013 #2

    Simon Bridge

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    You know that a strong EM field can be used to demagnetize something right?
    You know that light is electromagnetism right?

    Define "effective"? It works doesn't it?

    ... that would depend on the magnet and how the phenomenon were being used.
     
  4. Dec 13, 2013 #3
    Yes I knew light was a product of both magnetic&electric field, but never knew it could do that... thanks.
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2013
  5. Dec 14, 2013 #4

    Simon Bridge

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    It's a matter of making the connection - the details will be in the paper.

    The way to think of it is: electric and magnetic fields are each manifestations of an overall electromagnetic field - what you see depends on how you look at it.
     
  6. Dec 15, 2013 #5
    I could not picture it...
    What does a photon do to a moment exactly? Increases the energy thus causing demagnetization or...?
    This is pretty new and weird for me to understand.
     
  7. Dec 15, 2013 #6

    Simon Bridge

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    A magnetic dipole in an uneven magnetic field experiences a torque - so it's orientation can change.
    This is one way you make ferromagnets. Do you know how things become magnetized to start with?

    Thus the incoming light, if energetic enough, can knock a magnetic dipole moment into a new orientation.
    If the new orientation is random, then a previously magnetized material will lose it's magnetization.
     
  8. Dec 16, 2013 #7
    Yes.

    I see the connection here, a photon would excite the dipole moment, since it was previously aligned it has a low energy state.
     
  9. Dec 16, 2013 #8

    Simon Bridge

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    I don't know about "excite" - there would be several stable configurations for the magnetic dipoles in a ferro-magnet.
     
  10. Dec 16, 2013 #9
    Giving it more energy - is this the right term? :tongue:
    What seven stable configurations?
     
  11. Dec 17, 2013 #10

    Simon Bridge

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    ... I didn't count them.
    There would be a stable configuration in which the ferromaterial was not magnetized for instance.
     
  12. Dec 18, 2013 #11

    sophiecentaur

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    There are seveneral of them, perhaps?
     
  13. Dec 18, 2013 #12
    I'm sorry but your giving me puzzles here and I have no idea what you mean...
     
  14. Dec 18, 2013 #13

    Simon Bridge

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    Not everything made out of, say, iron, is a magnet.
    But it may become magnetized.
    Being magnetized is a stable state of the material.
    Being non-magnetized is another stable state.
    There are many combinations of magnetic moments that could lead to either state.
    The details depend on the material.
     
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