Yenka simulator to build an RS flip-flop

In summary,You are required to build an RS flip-flop using 2 NAND gates, switches, LEDs and 330Ω resistors. Test the circuit and prove its correct operation against the RS truth table, by print screening the 4 key modes and attaching a copy of your ‘RS flip-flop’ Yenka (or similar) file.
  • #1
NYAME EPHRAIM
10
1
< Mentor Note -- thread moved to HH from the technical forums, so no HH Template is shown >

a) Using the Yenka (or similar) simulator, you are required to build an RS flip-flop using 2 NAND gates, switches, LEDs and 330Ω resistors. Test the circuit and prove its correct operation against the RS truth table, by print screening the 4 key modes and attaching a copy of your ‘RS flip-flop’ Yenka (or similar) file.

here is the diagram below i produced for the above task
Capture max follow up.PNG
 

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  • #2
So, where is your output? The only place I see where one would assume the output to be, you have tied back to ground.

Also, the left part of your circuit diagram is unnecessarily confusing and should be redrawn.
 
  • #3
I moved this to a homework forum, which is more appropriate.

In the future, please use the homework forum and fill out the template. You did show us your work but you didn't ask a question.

p.s. Sorry @phinds, I cross posted with you.
 
  • #4
NYAME EPHRAIM said:
330Ω resistors.
Your resistor values need updating. Also, are you using a 1V power supply rail on purpose?
 
  • #5
berkeman said:
Your resistor values need updating. Also, are you using a 1V power supply rail on purpose?
Jeez, I was so struck by the lack of an output and the confusing way the circuit is drawn that I didn't even notice that. Glad to see someone here pays attention :smile:
 
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  • #6
I should also point out that this is an RS-latch, not an RS-Flip Flop. A flip-flop is edge triggered (only changes state on a clock edge) but a latch can change output whenever the inputs change. This may seem like semantics but the different behaviors make a big difference depending on the kinds of circuits you want to build with this. Many arithmetic circuits, for instance, require flip flops to suppress glitches that can wreak havoc on the calculations.

In case you're interested, a common way to make a Flip Flop out of latches (common in school, not so common in practice) is to use two latches clock out of phase (you can generate the negative phase internal to your Flip Flop). That way, even though the two latches are asynchronous, the flip flop as a whole is edge-triggered.
 
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  • #7
Hi @NYAME EPHRAIM, Welcome to PF.

Yes, your circuit very nearly meets the requirements stated in your first post. The overall wiring looks correct but a couple details need adjusting. The comments about the supply voltage do bring to mind that the supply voltage for the logic gates needs to be at least high enough to drive the output LEDs. I also noticed that you are not using the 330 Ohm resistors; is there a reason?

It seems some folks did not notice the "2 nand gate" requirement. I would truly like to see a flip-flop from the parts list you were given.

These days, most common logic circuits use either 3.3 or 5 Volts, and that is what they were expecting. However, over 15 years ago Texas Instruments came out with logic that works down to 0.8V. (http://www.ti.com/lit/ml/sceb011a/sceb011a.pdf)

Cheers,
Tom
 
  • #8
I suspect the OP or his tutor meant latch when he wrote flip-flop.
 
  • #9
This is a neater way to draw the switches...
DRDpI.png


The convention is to put higher voltage nodes (eg VCC or VDD) at the top and lower voltage nodes (gnd, 0V or -ve voltage rails) at the bottom of the drawing.
 

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Related to Yenka simulator to build an RS flip-flop

1. What is Yenka simulator?

Yenka simulator is a software program that allows users to simulate and build electronic circuits, including an RS flip-flop.

2. How does Yenka simulator work?

Yenka simulator uses a drag-and-drop interface to allow users to select and connect electronic components to build a circuit. It also provides simulation tools to test and troubleshoot the circuit.

3. What is an RS flip-flop?

An RS flip-flop is a basic digital logic circuit that has two inputs, R (reset) and S (set), and two outputs, Q (output) and Q̅ (inverted output). It is commonly used in sequential logic circuits for storing data.

4. How can I build an RS flip-flop using Yenka simulator?

To build an RS flip-flop using Yenka simulator, you can select and connect logic gates, such as NAND or NOR gates, to create the R, S, Q, and Q̅ inputs and outputs. You can also use the simulation tools to test and modify the circuit as needed.

5. What are the benefits of using Yenka simulator to build an RS flip-flop?

Using Yenka simulator to build an RS flip-flop allows for a hands-on and interactive approach to learning about digital logic circuits. It also provides a virtual environment for testing and modifying the circuit without the need for physical components. This can save time and resources, making it a convenient and cost-effective option for students and professionals alike.

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