SPECTRUM ANALYZER + pc


by manthan
Tags: analyzer, spectrum
manthan
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#1
Aug18-10, 01:52 AM
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Hi everyone,
i want to operate spectrum analyzer by pc or laptop. Is there such interface of spectrum analyzer and pc possible? If yes, then how? Tell me the name and contact detail of person who have make such interface..
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brewnog
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#2
Aug18-10, 12:00 PM
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Picoscope.

Most pieces of sound recording software also usually have spectral analysers.
waht
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#3
Aug18-10, 03:52 PM
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What's the frequency range you want to measure?

manthan
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#4
Aug25-10, 11:28 PM
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SPECTRUM ANALYZER + pc


Quote Quote by waht View Post
What's the frequency range you want to measure?
frequency 100-180 Ghz
berkeman
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#5
Aug26-10, 11:55 AM
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Quote Quote by manthan View Post
frequency 100-180 Ghz
Yikes, you're not messing around! This unit from Agilent goes up to 50GHz and uses Benchlink software to connect to a PC:

http://www.home.agilent.com/agilent/...ect=SR.General

You can look around Agilent's website to see if they have a unit that goes up to 180GHz.
Mech_Engineer
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#6
Aug26-10, 12:10 PM
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Does a scope or spectrum analyzer even exist that can analyze a 100-180GHz signal?! I suspect not even close, the top-of-the-line Tektronix and Agilent scopes barely reach 20-50GHz and cost well over $100,000...
Topher925
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#7
Aug26-10, 01:35 PM
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Quote Quote by Mech_Engineer View Post
Does a scope or spectrum analyzer even exist that can analyze a 100-180GHz signal?! I suspect not even close, the top-of-the-line Tektronix and Agilent scopes barely reach 20-50GHz and cost well over $100,000...
I didn't even know people manufactured electronics that operated at those frequencies let alone logic analyzers.
Mech_Engineer
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Aug26-10, 02:20 PM
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Quote Quote by Topher925 View Post
I didn't even know people manufactured electronics that operated at those frequencies let alone logic analyzers.
Maybe he meant 100-180 MHz, in which case he can buy any number of units to analyze the signals...
waht
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#9
Aug26-10, 02:53 PM
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What you need is a waveguide harmonic mixer adapter for a spectrum analyzer. Agilent manufactures harmonic mixers up to 325 GHz in various ranges.

VA Diodes makes harmonic mixers up to 1.5 THz

In either case, they are absurdly expensive. Expect to fork out 20K for just the adapter, and 100K for a spectrum analyzer.
waht
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#10
Aug26-10, 03:05 PM
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Quote Quote by Mech_Engineer View Post
Does a scope or spectrum analyzer even exist that can analyze a 100-180GHz signal?! I suspect not even close, the top-of-the-line Tektronix and Agilent scopes barely reach 20-50GHz and cost well over $100,000...
Agilent has sampling oscilloscopes that work up to 100 GHz and has recently rolled out real time scopes that work up to 30 GHz, but they cost like 250K. Spectrum analyzers covering 100 GHz have existed for more than 30 years.
Mech_Engineer
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#11
Aug26-10, 03:42 PM
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Quote Quote by waht View Post
Agilent has sampling oscilloscopes that work up to 100 GHz and has recently rolled out real time scopes that work up to 30 GHz, but they cost like 250K. Spectrum analyzers covering 100 GHz have existed for more than 30 years.
I'm not up to speed on what the differences are between a sampling o-scope, real-time o-scope, and spectrum analyzer... Nonetheless, it sounds like a spectrum analyzer may exist for the sort of frequencies the OP is looking for, although possibly not something cheap and easy that he can plug into his computer.
waht
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#12
Aug26-10, 04:42 PM
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Quote Quote by Mech_Engineer View Post
...it sounds like a spectrum analyzer may exist for the sort of frequencies the OP is looking for, although possibly not something cheap and easy that he can plug into his computer.
yes, and based on OP's other threads, it sounds like OP is actually working on something advanced without having so much a clue of the basics which leads me to believe the OP is a troll. This kind of equipment can be accessed in graduate schools, in defense contractor and other types of research labs.
f95toli
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#13
Aug27-10, 07:56 AM
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Analysers covering that range are extremely rare and extremely expensive (it would be considered a major investment even for a big research institute).
But I agree with Waht, the OP is probably is troll.
Anyone working with equipment that operates in that frequency range will know how to do something as basic as connecting measurement equipment to a PC( since anyone who needs analyser will presumably already have the source, waveguides/quasioptics etc so we are talking about quite sophisticated and expensive equipment, not something that would be used by a total novice without supervision).

Although I guess it is possible that he really meant kHz (not GHz).,..


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