Studies on muscular strength in individuals with EDS?


by TubbaBlubba
Tags: individuals, muscular, strength, studies
Proton Soup
Proton Soup is offline
#19
Jun28-10, 04:27 PM
P: 1,070
Quote Quote by TubbaBlubba View Post
Yep, I'm still at it. Can't think of much to say. Got a few more heavy plates and my deadlift isn't quite as bad as I thought, 70 kilograms with little trouble. My arms are as weak as ever, though. I'm really struggling doing biceps curls with the dumbbell even with as little as 20-25 kgs; Might be my form, though. And biceps curls are far from the most important exercises. Rows go fine, don't recall the exact weight, 55 or so. Floor presses are mediocre; 30 kilograms is pushing it, 35 is impossible even with a single press. The overhead press is okay at around 25; I think it has more to do with general stability than arm and shoulder strength, I should give a shot at sitting down.

Plus since I'm cutting down my body fat right now (yes, I'm vain) I'm not really expecting to see any great improvements in strength.

I also ordered a pair of yoga bands for pullup training; I've been given the tip of putting your ankles on a chair, wrapping the bands around your feet and pulling yourself up.

I've been a bit torn between how to do my cardio (I use a crosstrainer); Right now I go at maximum resistance in a steady pace (40 RPM most of the time) and it gets my heartrate up good after a while. I can't keep it up for much more than 10 minutes at a time though, so I do it in a couple of intervals. I've been trying to do at least 30 minutes a day; Hopefully I'll get better interval length with time.
uh, 25kg biceps curls with one arm is very good. out of proportion to the rest. but yeah, it's the least thing to worry about. better to stick with compound movements, imo. stability in the torso will limit overhead press, but overhead press may also build stability in the torso. deadlift will also do this. sandbag training can also be a way to build a strong core and functional strength.

anyhoo, glad to hear things are going well.
TubbaBlubba
TubbaBlubba is offline
#20
Jun29-10, 05:32 AM
P: 111
Quote Quote by Proton Soup View Post
uh, 25kg biceps curls with one arm is very good. out of proportion to the rest. but yeah, it's the least thing to worry about. better to stick with compound movements, imo. stability in the torso will limit overhead press, but overhead press may also build stability in the torso. deadlift will also do this. sandbag training can also be a way to build a strong core and functional strength.

anyhoo, glad to hear things are going well.
25kg with both arms usin a barbell. I do no more than 10 with one arm.
bracept
bracept is offline
#21
Jan12-12, 12:16 PM
P: 1
Hi TubbaBlubba,

I know it is a while since this thread was active but found it searching for EDS and resistance training and found this very useful. I am a UK physiotherapist and I have treated a number of people with EDS over the years however we are often referred people with an acute problem and not given the time to develop and train patients/clients through a progressive strengthening programme as you have described.

As has been mentioned there is little research to provide specific evidence or concepts as to what we as professionals should be advising and formulating with our treatment advice. Over the last few years I have taken an increasing interest in kinetic control principles (http://www.kineticcontrol.com/) that is a model that uses specific structured movement tests to determine dysfunction and thus facilitate the physios ability to correct and improved movement patterns, therefore improving pain and reducing the risk of reinjury for patients.

I have a strong interest in strength and conditioning having worked closely with many coaches and as various levels of sport from amateur teams to elite athletes and also some time with disability sports (particularly challenging was working with cerebral palsy football teams) so I am intrigued to know further down the line how you are doing?

My experience would tell me with EDS that you are doing exactly the right things with your training as to summarise simply:

1. EDS causes hypermobility of collagen fibres
2. Joints inherently have increased laxity resulting in increased risk of acute injury and chronic degeneration due to excessive sheering forces on the joints
3. Kinetic control theory states to improve stability require efficient motor control/muscular strength
4. Resistance training (with the correct form and neuromuscular control) is the only way to significantly improve strength

I have not been able to find any evidence as yet whether type 3 EDS has any impact on acute muscle fibres, perhaps there has been no research as yet?! But as I said I would love to hear an update on how you are progressing?

Thanks


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