Free Video Lectures from universities, all Math and Physics courses


by flyingpig
Tags: courses, free, lectures, math, physics, universities, video
gauss^2
gauss^2 is offline
#19
Sep11-11, 08:02 PM
P: 50
Quote Quote by saim_ View Post
Video lectures from HarveyMudd on real analysis are absolutely first rate, compared to any video lecture series out there, including the stuff on MIT OCW. I have watched and liked the entire series of lectures. They are based on "the" text on real analysis (baby rudin) and the lectures themselves are very well planned and delivered.
Yeah, I have viewed that entire class, and it's phenomenal. It's too bad Baby Rudin will never have the great diagrams Prof Su illustrates the material with in those videos (everybody wanted to write like Bourbaki back then it seems). Baby Rudin is really hard to understand if you can't come up with diagrams on your own, so these videos give a heck of a leg up on that challenging text.
gauss^2
gauss^2 is offline
#20
Sep11-11, 08:15 PM
P: 50
I would recommend having a multivariable calc class before doing analysis at the level of Baby Rudin. Single-variable calc you can get by on the formulas, but you tone up your geometric skills in multivariable with tangent planes, normals, volume elements and so on. Having strong geometric visualization skills pays big dividends in Baby Rudin when you're trying to understand the chapter on topology.
Sway
Sway is offline
#21
Sep23-11, 12:59 PM
P: 3
College of staten island's engineering department put together this resource lists of free college learning material, I found it useful! maybe some of you might too

http://www.apsc.csi.cuny.edu/csiengd...k/reflink.html
Pr0x1mo
Pr0x1mo is offline
#22
Oct3-11, 01:45 PM
P: 20
anyone have a good link for complex analysis?
Sankaku
Sankaku is offline
#23
Oct4-11, 12:14 PM
P: 714
Quote Quote by Pr0x1mo View Post
anyone have a good link for complex analysis?
Yes

http://physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=366773
mathwonk
mathwonk is offline
#24
Nov23-11, 12:52 PM
Sci Advisor
HW Helper
mathwonk's Avatar
P: 9,421
i have been watching a few of these videos from khan academy and harvey mudd, and the thing that strikes me is how clear they are and also how slowly they move. it is hard for me to believe that schools like harvey mudd do not take more for granted from their students than that. It is hard for me to believe that a good student there who has read the book would be able to force himself to go to class.

My classes at UGA move much faster than those classes (as well as the ones I have seen at harvard, brandeis, and utah) and go much deeper than the khan academy courses. I would recommend a student in my class watch the khan academy video before coming to class, to help keep up with the lecture. And they need to watch several videos to cover one lecture.

I think the khan videos i have seen are remarkably clear, patient, and useful for even a high school student who knows almost nothing to get the basics of the subject, but I would think most college classes, certainly honors level ones, will be much more challenging than these videos. It also seems my honors level freshman calc at UGA (one level below the Spivak course) was on a higher level than harvey mudd's intro to analysis class, but i could be wrong.

I'm just saying, do not expect classes at top schools, especially those aimed at math majors, to hold your hand as some of these videos do. They will assume far more skill with algebra and background material, and discuss much deeper and more subtle aspects of the subject. Of course if an analysis student has only rudin to learn from he needs as much clarity and patience as possible from the lecturer.
Nano-Passion
Nano-Passion is offline
#25
Nov23-11, 01:38 PM
P: 1,305
Quote Quote by mathwonk View Post
i have been watching a few of these videos from khan academy and harvey mudd, and the thing that strikes me is how clear they are and also how slowly they move. it is hard for me to believe that schools like harvey mudd do not take more for granted from their students than that. It is hard for me to believe that a good student there who has read the book would be able to force himself to go to class.

My classes at UGA move much faster than those classes (as well as the ones I have seen at harvard, brandeis, and utah) and go much deeper than the khan academy courses. I would recommend a student in my class watch the khan academy video before coming to class, to help keep up with the lecture. And they need to watch several videos to cover one lecture.

I think the khan videos i have seen are remarkably clear, patient, and useful for even a high school student who knows almost nothing to get the basics of the subject, but I would think most college classes, certainly honors level ones, will be much more challenging than these videos. It also seems my honors level freshman calc at UGA (one level below the Spivak course) was on a higher level than harvey mudd's intro to analysis class, but i could be wrong.

I'm just saying, do not expect classes at top schools, especially those aimed at math majors, to hold your hand as some of these videos do. They will assume far more skill with algebra and background material, and discuss much deeper and more subtle aspects of the subject. Of course if an analysis student has only rudin to learn from he needs as much clarity and patience as possible from the lecturer.
I completely agree, I stopped watching Khan videos because the slow pace really bores! Their videos are quite rudimentary, albeit they are very good for grounding a concept and getting introduced to the basics. I find the book a much better resource, but that is only the case if one are comfortable with the formalism.

Quote Quote by mathwonk View Post
It is hard for me to believe that a good student there who has read the book would be able to force himself to go to class.
True. I go to class though because sometimes it gives you a deeper intuition / understanding about the subject. I also go to class to make sure I don't miss anything important or miss something that he stresses about, which is likely to be on the test. Most of the time I'll sit in the lecture and solve my own problems, and if I hear something notable then I would pay attention to that particular statement.
Sankaku
Sankaku is offline
#26
Nov23-11, 10:44 PM
P: 714
The Khan videos are really for people who either do not have access to traditional schooling or need remedial assistance. Most of the topics are for high-school level courses. His pace is perfect for what it is aimed at.

I believe the Harvey Mudd analysis class is for freshmen.
http://www.math.hmc.edu/~su/math131/

Good luck on doing a better job making Rudin work for 1st year students...
gauss^2
gauss^2 is offline
#27
Nov23-11, 11:07 PM
P: 50
Quote Quote by mathwonk View Post
It also seems my honors level freshman calc at UGA (one level below the Spivak course) was on a higher level than harvey mudd's intro to analysis class, but i could be wrong.
You discuss subtle things like compactness, construction of the reals, the Cantor set, and rearrangements in a first college math class? Wow, I would have gotten killed learning those concepts fresh out of high school, especially at a fast pace. I do agree that stuff like equivalence relations, induction, and rational numbers should be relegated to self study early in the quarter/semester if not covered in prereqs and spending two lectures on cardinality is a bit much, but wow... that topology chapter of Baby Rudin was really rough when we sped through it in my first analysis class. We missed out on lots of those great diagrams Prof Su gives to make the chapter seem like more than just a bunch of definitions and slick tricks to prove things.
WiFO215
WiFO215 is offline
#28
Jan21-12, 03:23 AM
P: 413
Video lectures on Quantum information theory by David Deutsch:
http://www.quiprocone.org/Protected/DD_lectures.htm

Video lectures on Information and entropy, MIT:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ur1QT-sGEKk
battousai
battousai is offline
#29
Mar10-12, 11:56 PM
P: 88
any video lectures on combinatorics?
GeoHamster
GeoHamster is offline
#30
Mar13-12, 04:03 AM
P: 4
My two cents

Thermodynamics (a bit chemistry oriented)
http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/chemistry...2008/index.htm

Vibrations and Waves
http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/physics/8...ves-fall-2004/

Linear Dynamical Systems
http://see.stanford.edu/see/coursein...7-2ba8bfcfe5f6
battousai
battousai is offline
#31
Apr20-12, 11:24 PM
P: 88
any lectures on Classical mechanics (upper division)?
Broccoli21
Broccoli21 is offline
#32
Apr21-12, 01:15 AM
P: 70
Quote Quote by battousai View Post
any lectures on Classical mechanics (upper division)?
Here you go. These are a more shallow introduction:
http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL189C0DCE90CB6D81
And these are a rigorous course:
http://www.youtube.com/view_play_lis...4E56893588CBA8
battousai
battousai is offline
#33
Apr21-12, 11:21 AM
P: 88
is the rigorous one up to the level of landau?
Broccoli21
Broccoli21 is offline
#34
May1-12, 02:40 AM
P: 70
is the rigorous one up to the level of landau?
I have not extensively read Landau/Lifgarbagez but the lectures seem to be at a similar level. If anything the lectures might be a bit less sophisticated, but by very little as far as I can tell.
SolsticeFire
SolsticeFire is offline
#35
May1-12, 09:10 AM
P: 63
Quote Quote by battousai View Post
is the rigorous one up to the level of landau?
Hey I'm working on the lectures and Landau's book right now. Lectures are very very good but still not on par with Landau in terms of rigor. That being said, the prof is wonderful and the depth probed by him during the lectures is at similar level to that of Landau's. I think Calkin's Lagrangian and Hamiltonian Mechanics supplement the lectures better than Landau.
saim_
saim_ is offline
#36
May12-12, 10:53 PM
P: 134
Are you guys talking about Landau's classical mechanics book? Because from the list of lectures here:

http://www.cosmolearning.com/video-l...dynamics-9732/

it seems the course is at a higher level than Landau. Landau's is a small 167 page text with no applications of classical mechanics to other physics.


Register to reply

Related Discussions
Audio/video courses and lectures on chemistry Other Science Learning Materials 7
some free video lectures on Physics, maths and all sciences Physics Learning Materials 1
Collection of free physics and mathematics video lectures! Physics Learning Materials 2
Free Video Lectures Math & Science Learning Materials 0