Adjective term of pertaining to a non-Earth moon..


by EBENEZR
Tags: adjective, lunar, moon, planetary
EBENEZR
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#1
Oct31-12, 11:59 AM
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Sorry I know this may seem banal but it's really bugging me. I'm making space scenes of made up solar systems in a 3d modelling program and I want to name one "a ~ transit".

If it was a generic planet, I could call it a planetary transit, or if it was OUR moon, I could call it a Lunar transit... but what the Dickens am I meant to use for a moon that is not of Earth?
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tiny-tim
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#2
Oct31-12, 05:11 PM
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Hi EBENEZR!

I think you're stuck with "lunar".
Chronos
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#3
Nov1-12, 03:08 AM
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Natural sattelite sounds promising.

EBENEZR
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Nov1-12, 04:38 AM
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Adjective term of pertaining to a non-Earth moon..


Quote Quote by tiny-tim View Post
Hi EBENEZR!

I think you're stuck with "lunar".
I may be, I just think it's a little misleading as lunar specifically relates to our moon through mythological references.

Quote Quote by Chronos View Post
Natural sattelite sounds promising.
That's fine for a noun, but it seems a little clumsy for an adjective 'A lunar transit'/'a natural satellite transit'. I mean if that's the word, then there's nothing I can do, it seems surprising that an unnamed non earth moon hasn't got its own adjective. I may have to make one up.
Eliyak
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#5
Nov2-12, 04:15 PM
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Satellitic. It's not a word, but that hasn't stopped people from using it. (www.wordnik.com/words/satellitic) Think of it as being on the cutting edge of etymology.
EBENEZR
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#6
Nov2-12, 05:37 PM
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Quote Quote by Eliyak View Post
Satellitic. It's not a word, but that hasn't stopped people from using it. (www.wordnik.com/words/satellitic) Think of it as being on the cutting edge of etymology.
"Cutting edge of etymology" - haha! As a language lover this turn of phrase made me laugh. I'm going to use it too.
mfb
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#7
Nov3-12, 05:22 PM
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"a moon transit"?
EBENEZR
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#8
Nov4-12, 03:37 AM
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Quote Quote by mfb View Post
"a moon transit"?
I don't think that makes sense grammatically though, like how "a planet transit" doesn't.
Bandersnatch
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#9
Nov4-12, 07:42 AM
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Quote Quote by EBENEZR View Post
I don't think that makes sense grammatically though, like how "a planet transit" doesn't.
Attributive use of nouns is grammatically correct, afaik:
http://www.merriam-webster.com/help/...tes/attrib.htm

You don't use "planet transit" for the simple reason that an equivalent adjective "planetary" is available.
chemisttree
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Nov4-12, 07:21 PM
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Moonary? Hmmmm.
EBENEZR
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Nov7-12, 04:14 AM
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Quote Quote by Bandersnatch View Post
Attributive use of nouns is grammatically correct, afaik:
http://www.merriam-webster.com/help/...tes/attrib.htm

You don't use "planet transit" for the simple reason that an equivalent adjective "planetary" is available.
Interesting, thanks! I'm just surprised that one hasn't come up, when you consider almost every named moon and planet in the solar system has a denonym or adjectival term, you'd think simply "moon" would be one of the first to have its own. Ho hum.
Drakkith
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Nov7-12, 10:37 AM
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Moonar transit. There, problem solved!
Bandersnatch
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Nov7-12, 02:53 PM
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MoonarTM
The new, cutting-edge, prescription-free, satellitic adjective straight from PF's linguistic skunkworks! Coming to your 'hood this November.


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Gordon1
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#14
Nov15-12, 02:17 AM
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In the movie Red Planet, Val Kilmer ("space janitor"), exprssed the same discomfort while viewing Phobos from the surface of Mars. Fun movie, check it out.
Pasha582
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#15
Nov15-12, 02:39 PM
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Quote Quote by Drakkith View Post
Moonar transit. There, problem solved!
I was leaning towards "moonetary" transit. Sounds more pecuniary that way.
goldsax
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#16
Nov16-12, 04:21 AM
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satellite


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