Finding an old post


by LCKurtz
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LCKurtz
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Nov8-12, 03:14 PM
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Sometimes a thread comes up about a topic I have posted at length on, but long ago. I may want to give a link to my old post, but frequently I don't remember what the thread was titled. I may recall some particular words or phrases I used in the discussion. Is there any way to search one's own threads by contents of the posts?
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Greg Bernhardt
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Nov8-12, 03:16 PM
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You can do that in advanced search
http://www.physicsforums.com/search.php
LCKurtz
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Nov8-12, 03:22 PM
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Perfect. Thanks for the quick response Greg. I hadn't noticed that feature.

Borek
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Nov8-12, 04:03 PM
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Finding an old post


You can also try to use google for that - search for the words you remember, your nick, and add site:physicsforums.com.

That's how I locate pepper cookies recipe each time I want to check it: https://www.google.com/search?client...hannel=suggest
mfb
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Nov8-12, 04:18 PM
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Quote Quote by Greg Bernhardt View Post
You can do that in advanced search
http://www.physicsforums.com/search.php
Unfortunately, the search function uses OR for multiple words. And many physics-related words give too many hits to check all of them.
Evo
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Nov8-12, 04:22 PM
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Quote Quote by mfb View Post
Unfortunately, the search function uses OR for multiple words. And many physics-related words give too many hits to check all of them.
If it was your post, posting your member name in the google search will narrow it, you can use their advanced search and specify that your name MUST be in the result. I have pretty good luck that way.


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